Account: The Baptism of Poland into Christianity a Thousand Years Before Has Shaped a Whole Country, Poland, and Its Spirit

The President of Poland himself tells of how the coming of Poland to Christianity 1050 years ago was the birth of his country, for a new Christian life, defining Polish identity ever since.
see rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2016/04/hope-celebration-of-1050th-anniversary.html

Poland unfortunately had an interruption in its Christian culture during the communist period.

From what I know - it was nothing even close to the Soviet Union or even to today’s secularism.

We can thank Lech Walesa for restoring Christian values to Poland.

Actually it didn’t. To imply that would mean that people were leaving the Catholic Church. Church attendance was much higher in Poland while under Soviet rule than of what it is today. Dissidents of the Communist regime held secret meetings in Church basements. When Pope John Paul II visited his homeland for the first time as pope in 1979, thirteen million people attended at least one of his events. While thirteen million may not seem like a lot, it was around one third (33%) of Poland’s population at the time.
Father Jerzy Popiełuszko was murdered by the Secret Police for speaking out openly against the government and advocating human rights and freedoms.
With the rise of the Solidarity movement in the 1980s, Church attendance reached its highest point in Polish history and that attendance has not been surpassed since. The Polish bishops were involved in the Round Table Talks between the Communist government and members of the Solidarity movement and did everything they could to prevent violence. They were successful in their goal.
Attendance in the Polish Catholic Church has fallen since the 1980s, despite over 90% of the population claiming to be Roman Catholic.

The Polish people were forced to give up the practice of their Catholic Faith but they never gave up the Faith itself. God Bless them with peace and Gods will from now on. God Bless, Memaw.

Where are you getting this information that they were forced to give up their practice? Sure the government spied on certain Churches, and did the best they could to sabotage certain things like Church Processions, and made it extremely hard for people to get the required permissions to build new Churches. However, the Poles remained faithful to their practice. Church attendance was higher in the 1980s, under Soviet rule, than that of what it is today…When Pope John Paull II visited Poland, nearly 1/3 of the population went to at least one of his events. Doesn’t sound like anybody was forced to give up their practice.