Archangels saints?

Status
Not open for further replies.
M

Maddalena

Guest
I have often heard the names of the archangels with the title of “Saint” (St. Michael the Archangel, St. Raphael the Archangel, etc.). Why do we call the archangels saints?
 
40.png
Maddalena:
I have often heard the names of the archangels with the title of “Saint” (St. Michael the Archangel, St. Raphael the Archangel, etc.). Why do we call the archangels saints?
For an angel can not be a saint.
 
But why do we still call Michael the Archangel “Saint Michael the Archangel” in the prayer?
 
40.png
Maddalena:
But why do we still call Michael the Archangel “Saint Michael the Archangel” in the prayer?
I don’t know? I only pray to God. 🙂
 
It depends how you are using the word “saint”.

Check out Jimmy Akin’s paper, “What is a Saint?” If the term “Saint” is derived from “sanctus” (holy, sacred), then as Jimmy points out, it can refer to anyone from the People of God to God Himself.
 
Ric,

You are comming from the protestant perspective when only people who are"saved" are saints. That is not the Catholic position on sainthood, which is those that are with God in heaven that can intercede to him for us. Archangels are with God and there for have been declared Saints by the Church.
 
40.png
Ric:
I don’t know? I only pray to God. 🙂
Ric,

Vincent’s post makes a very important tangential point. Notice how the meaning of the word saint means holy. Let me suggest that you take note of the fact that catholics and protestants use many of the same terms but do not always share their definitions. The word prayer is another example. It can mean “to ask” (which is its most basic meaning), or it can mean praise, thanksgiving, or worship.

We can all learn from each other and have a greater understanding of one another if we are cognizant of our differing use of words. Often we will discover that we had more in common than previouslythought.
 
Tyler Smedley:
Ric,

You are comming from the protestant perspective when only people who are"saved" are saints. That is not the Catholic position on sainthood, which is those that are with God in heaven that can intercede to him for us. Archangels are with God and there for have been declared Saints by the Church.
Yes, you may be right. For only in the Bible we see any example of saints - all of whom are saved human beings. If there is an example of a saint in the Scriptures that are not human could you please point it out to me? I’m not trying to be confrontational here, I just want to learn. 🙂
 
40.png
Pax:
Ric,

Vincent’s post makes a very important tangential point. Notice how the meaning of the word saint means holy. Let me suggest that you take note of the fact that catholics and protestants use many of the same terms but do not always share their definitions. The word prayer is another example. It can mean “to ask” (which is its most basic meaning), or it can mean praise, thanksgiving, or worship.

We can all learn from each other and have a greater understanding of one another if we are cognizant of our differing use of words. Often we will discover that we had more in common than previouslythought.
I wish we all had a list of words we could agree upon!
 
The word saint is just a word…and the meaning of words can vary based on context. The word saint simply means ‘holy person’, does it not? So angels are certainly holy. As well, for Catholics the word ‘saint’ can refer to a number of different groups of ‘beings’, and in this case, it refers to holy spirits in Heaven to offer up our prayers to God (interceding for us). As we can see in this two verses, both human saints and angels do this (and we know that angels intercede for us from the book of Tobit as well, but I will not include this here, as I assume that Ric does not believe that Tobit belongs in the Canon).

And when he had taken the book, the four living creatures and the four and twenty elders fell down before the Lamb, having each one a harp, and golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints.
(Rev. 5:8)

And another angel came and stood over the altar, having a golden censer; and there was given unto him much incense, that he should add it unto the prayers of all the saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne.
(Rev. 8:3)
 
40.png
Ric:
Yes, you may be right. For only in the Bible we see any example of saints - all of whom are saved human beings. If there is an example of a saint in the Scriptures that are not human could you please point it out to me? I’m not trying to be confrontational here, I just want to learn. 🙂
The Sacred Scriptures do not limit the application of hagios [Gk. Strongs #40] to saved human beings. Hagios means to be set apart and holy. It is true that in English hagios is translated as ‘saints’ when applied to humans but the Greek makes no such distinction. Saints are, if understood properly, those who have been set apart for God. Hagios is used of God the Father at Luke 1:49, John 17:11, 1 Peter 1:15, Revelation 4:8, and other places. It is used of the Son at Luke 1:35, Acts 3:14, 1 John 2:20 and others. It is also used frequently of the Spirit throughout the NT (Matthew 1:18, Luke 1:35, etc.).

The term is also applied to objects (see Hebrews 9:2, 3, 24, 25; 10:19).

Hagios is also applied by Jesus to the angels (see Mark 8:38). The holy or saintly angels in heaven have been set apart for God. The Scriptures identify a group of angels that rebeled and sinned against God and are therefore not hagios (Job 4:18, 1 Corinthians 6:3, 2 Peter 2:4, Jude 6, Revelation 8:10-11; 9:1).
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Back
Top