Attending a non-Catholic wedding

Status
Not open for further replies.
C

Chrismasfetus

Guest
Hi, I was just wondering what the Church says in attending non-Catholic weddings. Are Catholics allowed to attend such events? Are Catholics allowed to be part of a non-Catholic wedding party? Thanks! :whacky:
 
Is either the bride or the groom a Catholic, or have they always been non-Catholic? Or is this merely a hypothetical?
 
40.png
Chrismasfetus:
Hi, I was just wondering what the Church says in attending non-Catholic weddings. Are Catholics allowed to attend such events? Are Catholics allowed to be part of a non-Catholic wedding party? Thanks! :whacky:
Awesome! I hope you have a good time. Please pay attention to the pastor! 🙂
 
I would tend to stay away from those :eek: simply because I wouldn’t wnat to give the wrong impression to those who otherwise know were I stand. But anyways, that is just my own preference 👍
 
Just a hypothetical situation… are Catholics prohibited from attending? :ROFLMAO: Thanks!

-christine
 
James_2:24:
I would tend to stay away from those :eek: simply because I wouldn’t wnat to give the wrong impression to those who otherwise know were I stand. But anyways, that is just my own preference 👍
If neither party is Catholic, you are not giving the wrong impression if you attend. If they are both baptized Christians, then the marriage is both valid and sacramental. The sacrament of marriage is done by the husband and the wife, not the priest. So by NOT attending, you will send a message, but it may not be the one you want, especially if they are family.

I recently (last Easter) converted to the Catholic church. My wife and I were married in the Episcopal Church. My wife has a horribly difficult time with my conversion, and one of the reasons is because a number of her Catholic relatives would not attend our wedding 10 years ago. She has been horribly hurt by this, and it is just one more wedge between her and the Church that I have to overcome (read that as “pray a LOT for”) before she would ever consider converting also. It could cause a lot of pain that could put up a barrier to someone entering the Church later. Think well before you do it. If they aren’t part of your family, the impact would probably be less, but I don’t see any reason to add roadblocks to anyone’s journey home.

Now, if one or both ARE Catholic, for their marriage to be valid it must follow the Catholic form of marriage and be done properly; any variation in form would require a dispensation (not sure how to get one, but I’m not much interested, since I’m already married 🙂 ). If one or both are Catholic, and they don’t have a dispensation, I wouldn’t go in that case, as that message is one I would agree with. They should know that marriage is NOT valid.

Other than that, I guess whether you go or not is up to you, but I have not frequently been invited to any non-Christian weddings anyhow 😉 .

BTW, my sister and her husband have always been Catholic. Both of them were IN our wedding party. I didn’t notice at the time, but they didn’t participate in the Eucharist at the Episcopal Church. I think that is a good way to show that one doesn’t fully agree with the teaching of a non-Catholic church, but does recognize and celebrate the marriage of the two people.

Just my 2 cents…

Ken
 
A couple of my family members who were baptized Catholic but do not practice their faith, opted to get married in a Protestant church. I went to their reception but I did not attend the service.

In my card, I simply signed it…you are in my prayers!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Back
Top