BioSET/ applied kinesiology

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Little_Flower

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This question is sent to any orthodox Catholics who have a knowlege of alternative medicine, and or physics!

I have a friend who has been utilizing BioSet treatment to help in allergy elimination. Her allergies were so bad that she was almost totally housebound, unable to eat most foods, the little she ate had to be organic; she couldn’t even wear anything other than cotton. This treatment has been very helpful and has completely eliminated many allergies.

It deals with applied kinesiology, accupressure, chiropractic, and enzymes necessary for the various organs to work efficiently. Under Catholic morality, the intention, means and end must all be moral for an act to be moral. I think the intention and end are virtuous, namely healing, but some spiritual red flags were going up with the means.

This is “energetic” healing. The accupressure part of it deals with energy meridians in the body (which apparently can be empirically measured) but also the energy associated with things and feelings. This could be looked at from a molecular level, since all things have a unique combination of protons electrons and nuetrons and would therefore have their own signature “energy”. Thoughts are also the firing of electrical impulses through our nervous system. When you think “apple” and when I think “apple” presumabley a similar neurological firing is going on. Some say all this is based in Einsteins’ E=mc2. Given that, all matter then is E/c2, and somehow has an energetic underpinning. There is the full extent of my knowledge of physics! Also the body is muscle tested for strength when holding allergens. Muscle testing consists merely of holding out your arm. The doctor tries to push down the patients arm and the patient tries to resist. Makes sense to me that there would be some weakening of strength when holding an allergen. But the part that gave me pause, was the doctors testing words, which she said had their own “energy” too. All questions are asked in a yes or no format, just like a lie detector test. She would ask, “Should she take this enzyme in the morning?” “Should she take one tablet?” Using this she would come up with the proper dosage and the proper time of day to take the supplements. The part I don’t understand is that there was an obvous change in muscle strength in answer to these questions. It is possible that the subconscious brain could put all the facts together better than the conscious brain could. But still, red flags were flying and I had to stop the treatment. I hate to deprive our child of a healing therapy that has a very impressive track record, but was not willing to proceed until I had some spiritual peace about this. This is all detailed in a book called the “Food Allergy Cure” by Dr. Ellen Cutler. Here is the link allergies.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.BioSET%2DInstitute.com

I would greatly appreciate any or all (name removed by moderator)ut from those who might have some knowlege of this and its spiritual legitimacy
 
Little Flower:
This is “energetic” healing. The accupressure part of it deals with energy meridians in the body (which apparently can be empirically measured) but also the energy associated with things and feelings.
I could be wrong on this, but this sounds a lot like what martial artists would call “Chi” in Chineese or “Ki” in Japanese. It is based in Eastern (Asian) religious practices of cultivating one’s “Ki” or energy and focusing it on certain points of the body to either heal or cause damage. I’ve been studying martial arts for quite a while now, so I do have some knowledge of it, although I’ve never practiced it.

I vaguely remember a lady on EWTN talking about these kinds of healing practices and she seemed very opposed to it, although I can’t remember exactly why.
 
I have been taking karate for 12 years now, so I know of “chi” I always thought of it as pure mumbo jumbo actually, more of the “inner strength” and reaching down pushing hard even when you think you have nothing left. Never occurred to me it could be empirically measured, which I have read it can be.
 
You will find more reference to “chi” in the more spiritually based martial arts such as in the various forms of Kung Fu. All of their movements are based on directing and redirecting “chi.” If you simply look at the way they punch as opposed to the way someone doing Karate or Tae Kwon Do would punch you will notice a difference.

In Karate and Tae Kwon Do, your punch starts from your hip with your fist facing palm up. As you throw your punch, your fist rises from your hip to about shoulder level (or wherever your target is) and you rotate your fist palm down. You strike with knuckles of your index and middle finger which causes you to angle your wrist sideways a bit. If you trace a line from where your striking knuckles started to where they ended, you will see a very indirect and twisted line.

Those who try to implement the transfer of “chi” in their strikes believe that there must be a direct line so that your “chi” doesn’t get somehow caught up or wasted in the movement. In various forms of Kung Fu, you will find that the punch starts with the fist at shoulder height and the palm facing sideways. The punch goes straight forward and the strike is with the bottom three knuckles, thus, your arm should be in a stright line with no “kinks” where your “chi” can get caught up in. This is why posture is so important in “chi” exercises. It is the most efficient flow of energy. Here is a picture of what a Kung Fu punch looks like.

Anyhow, it all has origins in the eastern religions: Zen, Taoism, Buddhism, etc. Buddhist monks had weak bodies due to the amount of meditation they did and they were frequently the victims of muggings for their lack of ability to defend themselves. Bodhidharma developed a bunch of exercises for monks to practice that would strenghten their bodies and help them to defend themselves. These exercises were also ment to develop, stimulate, and balance their flow of internal “chi” energy to promote good health…and thus, the creation of martial arts. The Samurai, the elite military class of feudal Japan, were practicioners of Zen and would also incorperate the concept of “ki” into their martial arts.

But yes, these people do believe that you can cultivate your chi and transfer it into or through objects or other people. It can either damage or heal. Consequently, if you’ve heard of the Death Touch, it is nothing more than transfering your chi into a certain pressure point of another person to either block an artery or stop their heart, or something rediculous like that. In any case, I don’t see how this “chi” stuff could be a good thing.
 
Allergies are odd at times. Remember that because something works does not mean that it works for the reason that they are saying. People with multiple personalities can have allergic reactions with one personality and not with another; likewise you can make someone have an allergic reaction under hypnosis.

So does this mean that all allergic reactions are mental in nature? Absolutely not!! What it is saying is that the body can fake allergic reactions - sometimes anxiety and other things can cause very similar reactions but when looked at at a microbial level they are not the same.

Sometimes voodoo type medicine works because they simply misunderstand. Blue cheeses have a spirit in it that kills the sickness. No…blue cheese has a bacterium that has antibiotic effects; they did not know this so they attributed it to something else. Other times voodoo medicine works because they are treating something other than what they think - like I listed above with false allergic reactions.

If there are any Voodoo priests listening forgive me for my liberal use of the word.
 
Little Flower:
It deals with applied kinesiology, accupressure, chiropractic, and enzymes necessary for the various organs to work efficiently. Under Catholic morality, the intention, means and end must all be moral for an act to be moral. I think the intention and end are virtuous, namely healing, but some spiritual red flags were going up with the means.
All those you mentioned fall under Alternative medicine and the New Age Movement - Involvement in this automatically opens your life to influences of the occult…stay away!!!

The catholic position is clearly defined in this doc from the vatican:

vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/interelg/documents/rc_pc_interelg_doc_20030203_new-age_en.html

I know a little about these things through the ministry of a full time lay catholic evangelist who has been specifically studying this subject.There are several documents he has produced concerning this,if you want more information on anything in particular let me know, will be glad to help.
 
Actually, kinesiology, accupressure, reflexology are all firmly grounded in physiological validity. Though they may have had some spiritual connotation at one point, they bear little significance on the fact that they do in fact work. The gist of the whole thing is, are you using these alternative health practices to heal your body, or as a method of spiritual fulfillment? If you are using them purely as a method of non-invasive, drug free medical treatment, then you are not violating any Christian principle. However, if you include the spiritual aspects of these remedies, then you are interfering with the purview of Jesus Christ, and is a big “No no!”
 
First of all, I have been blasted as presenting myself as a “wannabe saint” I assure all of you I admire St. Therese, and thus the moniker. I don’t claim to have even a fraction of her holiness, though hopefully I will come closer to her level of sancity over time and with God’s grace.

To Apologia:
Do you know if there is a difference between kinesiology and applied kinesiology? My understanding is that the applied deals more with the “lie detector” response in muscle strength, for lack of a better word. If my understanding is correct, I would think that kinesiology might have more physiological grounding than applied kinesiogy. I guess I should do some googling on the matter. To answer your question, there is no spiritual element at all for me. Merely an effort to clean up a severe case of psoriasis, using a chiropractor for back problems and intestinal problems, and using homeopathy as a alternative to being a dumping ground for antibiotics every time we get the sniffles. Any info you might have on the physiology of these treatments I would appreciate.

Question 2: Would you use a practioner who was a New Ager? I found I did not want to trust my family’s health to someone who had radically different religious views than ours.

To Epiphania:
I went to the site, seemed more like a primer on New Age rather than an analysis of what is right and wrong with these modalities.
This paragraph muddied the waters a bit too:
“First of all, it is worth saying once again that not everyone or everything in the broad sweep of New Age is linked to the theories of the movement in the same ways. Likewise, the label itself is often misapplied or extended to phenomena which can be categorised in other ways. The term New Age has even been abused to demonise people and practices. It is essential to see whether phenomena linked to this movement, however loosely, reflect or conflict with a Christian vision of God, the human person and the world. The mere use of the term New Age in itself means little, if anything. The relationship of the person, group, practice or commodity to the central tenets of Christianity is what counts”

I have found a VERY devout Catholic who is a naturapath, iridologist (a new one to me, involves using the patterns of the iris to diagnose health) aromatherapist, and herbologist. Puzzling because the link you sent includes herbs, and iridology in the New Age section.

I would greatly appreciate any info you have from the friend you mentioned. PLEASE SEND IT OVER!

And Funkyhorn: (love these names!) thanks for the interesting info on kung fu, very different in style and execution from the kenpo I am familiar with.
 
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Apologia100:
Actually, kinesiology, accupressure, reflexology are all firmly grounded in physiological validity. Though they may have had some spiritual connotation at one point, they bear little significance on the fact that they do in fact work. The gist of the whole thing is, are you using these alternative health practices to heal your body, or as a method of spiritual fulfillment? If you are using them purely as a method of non-invasive, drug free medical treatment, then you are not violating any Christian principle. However, if you include the spiritual aspects of these remedies, then you are interfering with the purview of Jesus Christ, and is a big “No no!”
Hi,
I cant speak much for kinesiology and the others though Ive heard it to be a new age practice,I really dont know. About accupressure and accupuncture, these are based on the doctrine of vital force/vital energy which is a core new age doctrine.
So I guess thats enough to ban it whether you use it for healing or spiritual fulfillment…
 
There once was a litterer who while flying a small plane over the amazon, tossed out an empty pop bottle. Found by natives who had never experienced glass; the vessel was honored and declared magical. Strip away the implications, and its still a pop bottle.

Is the method still valid without all the new age gibberish?
Then dont pay money for the gibberish.
If your provider won’t cooperate, then they are following some other agenda. Use Caution.
 
I am a part of the alternative medicine crowd myself, I am a licensed massage therapist. I live in Ohio, the only state where it is a limited MEDICAL practice, like chiropractic or podiatry. Our testing for state boards consist of medically based knowledge only. One can be a part of this WITHOUT the New Age aspect, but it is VERY RARE! I proudly state on my website, bus cards and brochures that I take no part in Reiki or other energy healing. I thought there’d be Christians knocking down my door to avoid this stuff, but not so. Kinesiology is a legitimate science. Applied kinesiology is just that - applying the knowledge to help with treatment of the muscles. Muscle testing is OK, Physical therapists, massage therapists & regular MDs use it all the time.

**Accupressure & accupuncture ** have lots of studies that show they are effective & if you find someone who is skilled at doing ONLY these(careful esp. w/accupuncture, takes YEARS of training, make sure they are licensed & using disposable NEW needles), I’d say go for it. The problem is much of the legitimately proven healing techniques are combined with New Age stuff.

**Reiki, Polarity, other “Energy” healing ** I would absolutely stay away from. There are new ones cropping up all the time. Different people adding a little or changing a little so they can trademark the name & principles & charge a fortune for the training.

When I was in school, there was only 1 other girl who refused to take part in any New Age stuff & she was 7th day adventist. Even though the Ohio Med. Bd uses medical only for state boards, the other stuff is taught, because you’ve got to know at least the basics to pass the National Certification Test. I am going to have to do this because my husband may be losing his job & I want to be prepared to work in another state if we have to move. Anyway a couple of the students were already “Reiki Masters” & tried to convince us this was perfectly compatible w/Christianity. When they taught the basics of Reiki, we refused to participate & our instructor said we had to at least watch the video. We did & even the video made a big point about the fellow who “rediscovered” it was a Christian minister. We still didn’t buy it. Most Reiki practitioners will never tell you they make use of a “spirit guide.”

So the student who was a Reiki Master was paired w/me one day & she knew I did not want to take part in this, because she assumed I didn’t understand it. She Reiki Raped Me! I talk about this all the time & people laugh, but to me it is no joke. It is absolutely unethical to force treatment of any kind on a person who does not want it & deems it is against their religious beliefs. So even if a practitioner knows you don’t go for something, who’s to say they wont do some of this stuff w/o your knowledge? Some people think that nothing can affect you w/o your consent, but I don’t believe so. Look at the New Testament accounts of people w/unclean spirits.

The problem to me lies precisely here:, from the vatican link posted above re:New Age:(see red highlighted) "There is a remarkable variety of approaches for promoting holistic health, some derived from ancient cultural traditions, whether religious or esoteric, others connected with the psychological theories developed in Esalen during the years 1960-1970. Advertising connected with New Age covers a wide range of practices as acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic, kinesiology, homeopathy, iridology, massage and various kinds of “bodywork” (such as orgonomy, Feldenkrais, reflexology, Rolfing, polarity massage, therapeutic touch etc.), meditation and visualisation, nutritional therapies, psychic healing, various kinds of herbal medicine, healing by crystals, metals, music or colours, reincarnation therapies and, finally, twelve-step programmes and self-help groups.(25) The source of healing is said to be within ourselves, something we reach when we are in touch with our inner energy or cosmic energy.

I think it is a rare, rare, rare rare person who can be exposed to a little of this & not let it seep in, until you are gradually accepting more of it. it is a slippery slope to leaving the church completely Some of the people practicing are Christians who don’t know better, some are Wiccans, neopagans, & yes, even straight out Satanists. They are probably not going to announce this to you & even in a legitimate medical environment they may be allowed to do this stuff. Ask questions first. Your soul is nothing to play around with.there is so much goofy stuff I couldn’t even begin to name it all. I wish there was some ministry that was keeping up with all of it & posting the core beliefs & errors.
 
All of this is quite confusing. Some replys would suggest that this is a very black and white issue, that all accupuncture, homeopathy, kinesiology, etc. is not in line with our faith according to the vatican paper on New Age. Some would say if a treatment shows proof through a double-blind placebo controlled study, then it would be OK as it would have scientific backing…St. Thomas Aquinas addresses this. Some of this stuff does have the studies to show a real effect. Then what? If a doctor practicing Traditional Chinese Medicine prescribes herbs that “balance” systems in the body according to his understanding of ying and yang, but those herbs show merit in studies as having a real effect on those systems, is that wrong? I can’t get clear answers. There are homeopathic agents that show great results in double-blind placebo controlled studies and yet I have been told that homeopathy has a dubious background and would not be acceptable. Help!
 
All of this is quite confusing. Some replys would suggest that this is a very black and white issue, that all accupuncture, homeopathy, kinesiology, etc. is not in line with our faith according to the vatican paper on New Age. Some would say if a treatment shows proof through a double-blind placebo controlled study, then it would be OK as it would have scientific backing…St. Thomas Aquinas addresses this. Some of this stuff does have the studies to show a real effect. Then what? If a doctor practicing Traditional Chinese Medicine prescribes herbs that “balance” systems in the body according to his understanding of ying and yang, but those herbs show merit in studies as having a real effect on those systems, is that wrong? I can’t get clear answers. There are homeopathic agents that show great results in double-blind placebo controlled studies and yet I have been told that homeopathy has a dubious background and would not be acceptable. Help!
Well it just might be affecting, both, except that you can’t detect the spiritual. as with u can’t detect the soul. HOLY SPIRIT, GOD (actually they kinda can in one article i read).

the real question, is it just old terminology based on false belief of how it works? or is it working BOTH! and what does it do, as quoted earlier, it can be a slippery slope. “numbs you to god”

example (not the best). Reiki, you attribute god to the entire healing, but i’m sure many find they want to attribute themselves too. or something like that.
 
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