bowing head

Status
Not open for further replies.
H

hamburglar

Guest
Should one bow his or her head when the names of Jesus, Mary, the saint that is being celebrated that day, or the three names of the Trinity are spoken?

I was taught to do this, but I do not see anyone else doing it.
 
I am in the habit of doing it at the name of Jesus (that is what I taught), but not in the other situations you mentioned. I think it is still a good practice.

I do know a priest who bows at the names of Mary and the saint of the day when he is celebrating Mass.
 
Should one bow his or her head when the names of Jesus, Mary, the saint that is being celebrated that day, or the three names of the Trinity are spoken?
During Mass it is correct to do this.

From the 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) approved for the USA, which can be accessed from romanrite.com/girm.html :
“275. … a. A bow of the head is made when the three Divine Persons are named together and at the names of Jesus, of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and of the Saint in whose honor Mass is being celebrated.”
 
I bow my head when saying the Names of Jesus or Mary. 🙂 But I wasn’t aware that it should also be done, in honor of the saint of that day. Thanks for the information.
 
Thank you. What about outside of Mass? I was taught to do it then, as well.

Also there is this part:
A bow of the body, that is to say a profound bow, is made to the altar; during the prayers Munda cor meum (Almighty God, cleanse my heart) and In spiritu humilitatis (Lord God, we ask you to receive); in the Creed at the words Et incarnatus est (by the power of the Holy Spirit . . . made man); in the Roman Canon at the words Supplices te rogamus (Almighty God, we pray that your angel).
I know we are supposed to make a profound bow to the Altar and during the Creed, but what about those other ones? Are they only directions for the celebrant?
During Mass it is correct to do this.

From the 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) approved for the USA, which can be accessed from romanrite.com/girm.html :
“275. … a. A bow of the head is made when the three Divine Persons are named together and at the names of Jesus, of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and of the Saint in whose honor Mass is being celebrated.”
 
I think the Order of Mass in the Roman Missal directs only the priest make the other bows. Certainly this is the case for one:

“The priest bows and says inaudibly:
Lord God, we ask you to receive us …”.
(Roman Missal, Catholic Book Publishing Co., New York, 1985, page 371).
 
Should one bow his or her head when the names of Jesus, Mary, the saint that is being celebrated that day, or the three names of the Trinity are spoken?

I was taught to do this, but I do not see anyone else doing it.
While in the GIRM, the mass can go on without it. It is optional part which is why most people do not do it. You can still get the spiritual uplift of the mass without it.
 
While in the GIRM, the mass can go on without it. It is optional part which is why most people do not do it. You can still get the spiritual uplift of the mass without it.
It doesn’t say it’s optional. Just because people aren’t aware of it doesn’t mean it’s optional. They just haven’t been taught to do it. When I learned about it, I started doing it. It’s just a matter of respect and honor.
 
I love to bow my head at the words of consecreation and before I receive,
 
While in the GIRM, the mass can go on without it. It is optional part which is why most people do not do it. You can still get the spiritual uplift of the mass without it.
It doesn’t say it’s optional. Just because people aren’t aware of it doesn’t mean it’s optional. They just haven’t been taught to do it. When I learned about it, I started doing it. It’s just a matter of respect and honor.
To clarify, it is not because it is “optional” that “most people do not do it”, it is simply because they have not been catechized on why it is proper and why they should do it.
 
It doesn’t say it’s optional. Just because people aren’t aware of it doesn’t mean it’s optional. They just haven’t been taught to do it. When I learned about it, I started doing it. It’s just a matter of respect and honor.
The mass as a whole does not rise or fall on one bow or other gesture. A bow here does not mean a person is any less spiritual or more spiritual just because they do it. When you go around enough parishes, small details do vary from parish to parish. It does not make one mass or parish better than another or lesser than another.
 
The mass as a whole does not rise or fall on one bow or other gesture. A bow here does not mean a person is any less spiritual or more spiritual just because they do it. When you go around enough parishes, small details do vary from parish to parish. It does not make one mass or parish better than another or lesser than another.
That’s great to hear. That doesn’t explain why it’s not done nor why it shouldn’t be done.
 
The mass as a whole does not rise or fall on one bow or other gesture. A bow here does not mean a person is any less spiritual or more spiritual just because they do it.
And where in this thread has anyone said this?
It does not make one mass or parish better than another or lesser than another.
Would you agree some people are compelled to comment negatively towards older traditional piety?
 
I bow my head when saying the Names of Jesus or Mary. 🙂 But I wasn’t aware that it should also be done, in honor of the saint of that day. Thanks for the information.
What about the during the names of God the Father and the Holy Spirit? If you are going to bow your head in piety shouldnt you be bowing your head during the mention of any Persons of the Trinity ahead of the saints?
 
What about the during the names of God the Father and the Holy Spirit? If you are going to bow your head in piety shouldnt you be bowing your head during the mention of any Persons of the Trinity ahead of the saints?
No, traditionally, one bows the head at the name of Jesus (which is a name, not a title, like “Father” and “Holy Spirit”). One bows the head at the name of Mary as well, in honor to the Virgin Mother of God and the miracle of the Incarnation. One bows the head at the name of the saint of the day, in honor of them. And one bows the head at the invocation of the Trinity.

That’s been the (Latin) Church’s tradition for quite some time.
 
No, traditionally, one bows the head at the name of Jesus (which is a name, not a title, like “Father” and “Holy Spirit”). One bows the head at the name of Mary as well, in honor to the Virgin Mother of God and the miracle of the Incarnation. One bows the head at the name of the saint of the day, in honor of them. And one bows the head at the invocation of the Trinity.

That’s been the (Latin) Church’s tradition for quite some time.
“Father” and “Holy Spirit” are not names as well? What did Jesus mean when he said to baptise in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit?

Also, is the “name” of Jesus actually more esteemed than His being called “Son”? After all, He was Son before He was Jesus? Assuming that Son is a title and not a name.
 
“Father” and “Holy Spirit” are not names as well? What did Jesus mean when he said to baptise in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit? Also, is the “name” of Jesus actually more esteemed than His being called “Son”? After all, He was Son before He was Jesus? Assuming that Son is a title and not a name.
I don’t think “Father” is a name, I think it’s the title of a Person. And I think Jesus was always the name of the Son; it’s not so much that he was given the name name “Jesus” by Mary and Joseph, but that the angel told them to call the child “Jesus”: “Thou shalt call His name,” he says, and not, “shalt give Him a name,” for His name had been given from all eternity. (Bl. Maurus Rabanus, in the Catena Aurea on Matthew 1:21)

And yes, the name of Jesus is important: “at the name of Jesus every knee should bow” (Phil 2:9-11).The custom of bowing the head at the mention of His Name was formally written into law at the Second Council of Lyons, A.D. 1274, convened by Pope Gregory X: “Those who assemble in church should extol with an act of special reverence that Name which is above every Name, than which no other under Heaven has been given to people, in which believers must be saved, the Name, that is, of Jesus Christ, Who will save His people from their sins. Each should fulfil in himself that which is written for all, that at the Name of Jesus every knee should bow; whenever that glorious Name is recalled, especially during the sacred Mysteries of the Mass, everyone should bow the knees of his heart, which he can do even by a bow of his head.” (FishEaters.com on posture)
 
I don’t think “Father” is a name, I think it’s the title of a Person. And I think Jesus was always the name of the Son; it’s not so much that he was given the name name “Jesus” by Mary and Joseph, but that the angel told them to call the child “Jesus”: “Thou shalt call His name,” he says, and not, “shalt give Him a name,” for His name had been given from all eternity. (Bl. Maurus Rabanus, in the Catena Aurea on Matthew 1:21)

And yes, the name of Jesus is important: “at the name of Jesus every knee should bow” (Phil 2:9-11).The custom of bowing the head at the mention of His Name was formally written into law at the Second Council of Lyons, A.D. 1274, convened by Pope Gregory X: “Those who assemble in church should extol with an act of special reverence that Name which is above every Name, than which no other under Heaven has been given to people, in which believers must be saved, the Name, that is, of Jesus Christ, Who will save His people from their sins. Each should fulfil in himself that which is written for all, that at the Name of Jesus every knee should bow; whenever that glorious Name is recalled, especially during the sacred Mysteries of the Mass, everyone should bow the knees of his heart, which he can do even by a bow of his head.” (FishEaters.com on posture)
From the NIV
Luke 1:31 says: You will be with child and give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus.

Matthew 1:21: She will give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus,[c] because he will save his people from their sins."

www.crosswalk.com

These suggest Jesus is the Name first given to the Son when became God-man.

In my opinion, I really don’t think before Creation, the Son can be called Jesus. He can only be called Jesus in relation to His Messiahship. Although, from now on the Son can always be called Jesus because He will always be Man as well as God. Technically, his name was Jesus from all eternity because all of God’s plans come from eternity, as God exists outside of time. Again, these are my opinions.

For what my opinion is worth (not much :)), I would rather bow my head at the mention of God than the Blessed Virgin Mary. Mary is not a divine name. She herself is to be honoured, but she should not be praised as Jesus should be praised.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Back
Top