Bowing my head during the creed

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cholderby

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As a fairly new Catholic, I’m a little confused about why I am to bow my head during the part of the creed that talks about Jesus’ birth. My first thought was that, if there was to be any head bowing, it would be during the part that talks about the crucifiction.

What’s the story here?

Thanks!
 
“by the power of the Holy Spirit he was born of the Virgin Mary, and became man”

Humility think of it this was the God of all creation the maker of us men was willing for us to come and become one of us to suffer and die for us.

Talking to my son about it he said why would God leave the comfort of Heaven to come to earth. The only answer that I could give him is that is true Love.
 
I’m old enough to remember that in the old Latin Mass, we genuflected during the recitation of the phrase
“Et incarnatus est, de Spiritu Sancto ex Maria virgine, et homo factus est.” (and He was made incarnate by the Holy Spirit of the Virgin Mary, and became man.) The genuflection was in recognition of the second Person of the Holy Trinity becoming man for our sake. This practice seems to have been dropped for awhile with the vernacular liturgy, but is making a comeback as a bow instead of a genuflection.
 
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JimG:
. This practice seems to have been dropped for awhile with the vernacular liturgy, but is making a comeback as a bow instead of a genuflection.
There is a genuflection at Christmas and the Solemnity of Annunciation.
 
In my very orthodox church - many people bow slightly at those words “by the power of the Holy Spirit He was born of the Virgin Mary and became man”. Mostly the nice ladies who wear the mantillas on their heads bow – but I started to also.
It was explained to me that it was in honor of the incarnation.
It still says in the missalette to bow then.
I think it is nice.

The gesture takes nothing away from the crucifiction - we are kneeling during the consecration. And we are at the alter of calvary - 🙂
 
I’m old enough to remember that in the old Latin Mass, we genuflected during the recitation of the phrase
They still do in the FSSP mass I attend.
 
Instead of holding your head high and bragging that Jesus was a man, you’re reverently stating an inspired truth. The bow indicates your humble appreciation.
 
I sure wish this were the common practice it once was. Myself and perhaps one or two others in our parish practice this, even though the instruction is in the missalette
 
I bow at this part of the Creed – it’s in the rubrics, isn’t it? Not many do, though.

Nor do most people bow their heads slightly when they say “Jesus,” as I was taught as a child and still practice today. Not sure if bowing one’s head while saying “Jesus” is still taught.

'thann
 
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carlc:
I sure wish this were the common practice it once was. Myself and perhaps one or two others in our parish practice this, even though the instruction is in the missalette
I think I’m the only one at the Mass I attend. Of course I can’t be sure because my head is bowed. ( my husband told me) I also remember genuflecting when I first came into the Church in '63. I was taught pre-Vatican II and had to learn it all over again which is probably why it wasn’t as hard to be ‘new’ as it is for some converts…everyone was re-learning too! 🙂
 
My wife and I are normally the only ones in our church who bow our heads. It would help if the priests would do this!
 
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