Brutal Truth

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Jacob

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I was wondering if we, as Catholics, should tell the whole truth. I mean I do to the best of my abilty, but some people tell me that I am rude for doing so. Can anyone tell me what the CHURCH teaches.
 
Speak the truth in love.

It is not always easy to do, but if you want to know what to shoot for, watch and listen to as much of Fr. Benedict Groeschel as you can. He’s got it down. Very loving yet uncompromising in matters of truth.
 
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darcee:
There is almost always an honest way to be kind.
Very true, but in some cases kindness goes unrecognized, eh?
 
Try to be kind when explaining and dont do it in an arrogant and mocking way.
 
Have nothing to do with stupid, senseless controversies; you know that they breed quarrels. And the Lord’s servant must not be quarrelsome but kindly to every one, an apt teacher, forbearing, correcting his opponents with gentleness.
2 Tim. 2:23:25
 
I would suggest reading the book, The Hidden Power of… Kindness by Fr.Lawrence G. Lovasik put out by Sopiha Institude Press. The cover states: “A Practical Handbook for Souls Who Dare to Transfom the World, One Deed at a Time”. I found it to be very humbling and gave me lots of food for thought…🙂
 
There is also such a thing as prudence.

I don’t tell my kids everything they ask about until they are ready to hear it. The same could even be true with a husband and wife in certain situations, regarding some dirty laundry from decades ago. These things should be discussed, but there may be situations where one needs to determine how and when to say certain things.
 
gomer tree:
There is also such a thing as prudence.

I don’t tell my kids everything they ask about until they are ready to hear it. The same could even be true with a husband and wife in certain situations, regarding some dirty laundry from decades ago. These things should be discussed, but there may be situations where one needs to determine how and when to say certain things.
True.

Arguably, it would be sinful to tell someone the whole truth when it will surely result in harm. You can’t tell the WHOLE truth about sex to a three year old because they are mentally incapable of understanding it. You can’t tell someone who is about to jump off a bridge that yes, his wife really did run off with the milkman.

On matters of faith there can be no compromise. Ever.
 
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darcee:
There is almost always an honest way to be kind.
This is true but one doesn’t always need to volunteer a truthful statement. If someone asks how their new haircut looks, I would be obliged to give an honest answer. If they don’t ask I don’t feel the need to give them the honest truth.
 
The truth should always be told. However, it does not always have to be “brutal”. A good apologist learns how to present the faith to different groups, and individuals. Every group has its own blind spots. These are beliefs someone takes for granted, and doesn’t even realize it. It effects they way they hear and understand. It’s our paradigm, and takes an epiphany to overcome. Paradigm shifts are difficult. Like looking in the mirror and realizing, what was I thinking? That’s overcoming a blind spot. We all have spiritual blind spots. Learning what they are is a part of growing, and learning. Ignoring them can make for frustrating conversations with non-Catholics (and Catholics too for that matter). Always tell the truth, but be tactful about it. Speaking through someone’s blind spot can be like talking to a brick wall. Some people, though, have that moment after the conversation when it dawns on them what you meant. This is when the lightbulb comes on, and they realize what you meant. This doesn’t usually happen during the conversation, though.

As far as our thinking is concerned, blind spots are the essence of truth. They are inherrent truths that aren’t often explainable. Even when presented with contradictory facts that paradigm makes one keep that belief. Blind spots are much easier to see in others than ourselves.

Another thing to keep in mind when talking with non-Catholics is vocabulary. Often people will agree without knowing it because the vocabulary is different. Be tactful when presenting the faith. More people will be changed by our love, than by winning arguments. The first thing that drew me to the Catholic Church was Catholic piety. That sense of love is much harder to overcome than cold hard facts. I learned the facts later, but the love got me first.
 
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Jacob:
I was wondering if we, as Catholics, should tell the whole truth. I mean I do to the best of my abilty, but some people tell me that I am rude for doing so. Can anyone tell me what the CHURCH teaches.
You can always tell the truth and be diplomatic, this will get you far in many conversastions…
 
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Jacob:
I was wondering if we, as Catholics, should tell the whole truth. I mean I do to the best of my abilty, but some people tell me that I am rude for doing so. Can anyone tell me what the CHURCH teaches.
From “The Following of Christ”

“Evil ought not to be done for anything in the world, nor for the love of any human being; but yet for the benefit of one that is in need, a good work is sometimes freely to be left undone, or rather to be changed for what is better”
 
Just in case anyone is wondering, ‘The Following of Christ’ that Mandi refers to is actually a version of ‘The Imitation of Christ’. The text for both is virtually the same, however a different author is given credit. There seems to be some dispute over who actually wrote the book. I believe that traditional thinking gives credit to Thomas a’ Kempis. 😉
 
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