Communion plate

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robin_hood

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I have read Redemptionis Sacramentum recently and I am very fortunate that my parish is very good when it comes to the liturgy.
The only short falling as in most parishes in England is the non-use of the communion plate at communion.This is covered in paragraph 93 of the document where it says that the Communion plate is to be retained.
A Catholic newspaper in England raised a good question what do you do with the plate when people receive in the hand.
As I will be raising this matter in my own parish can any liturgical experts out their help me with this question.
 
robin hood:
I have read Redemptionis Sacramentum recently and I am very fortunate that my parish is very good when it comes to the liturgy.
The only short falling as in most parishes in England is the non-use of the communion plate at communion.This is covered in paragraph 93 of the document where it says that the Communion plate is to be retained.
A Catholic newspaper in England raised a good question what do you do with the plate when people receive in the hand.
As I will be raising this matter in my own parish can any liturgical experts out their help me with this question.
The paten is important because it helps to ensure the proper handling of the Most Blessed Sacrament. Up on the altar it keeps fragments from being lost.

During Communion it is good insurance in case the Most Blessed Sacrament is dropped – MANY people still receive on their tongue.

Finally it’s tradition. And maintaining traditions like these are never a bad idea.
 
peace be with you! since at my parish they never stopped using the paten (Communion plate), i will just tell you what they do at my parish. of course when someone receives on the tongue they put the paten up under their mouth so if the Host drops it would land there. when receiving on the hand, the altar boys just put the paten under the hand. hope that helps.

in Jesus and Mary,
dominic savio
 
The widespread failure to use the “Communion Plate,” the paten, is one of the many tradgedies resulting from the loss of the St. Pius V Mass rubrics (traditional Mass). The dropping of a complete Sacred Host or the inevitable small particles happens frequently. I served Mass for eight years during the 1940’s, when the rubrics were firmly established and observed throughout the world. I can tell you from personal experience that never once during those years when I held the paten under the chin of the communicants, assuming there were more than 5 or 6 receiving, did I hand that paten back to the priest without small particles of the Sacred Host collected on the plate.

As for Communion in the hand (which I consider to be a sacrilege), the rules for receiving in the hand state that the communicants must consume the Sacred Body in the presence of the priest (minister), and NOT walk away with the Host in their hands. I have NEVER seen that rule observed. Everyone whom I have observed walks away, then consumes the Sacred Body. From my experience with the patent for eight years, I believe that the floor, shoes, clothing, etc. are covered with those Sacred Particles, each of which is the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of the Risen Christ. If the rule was observed, then a paten could be held by an alter server under the area of the hands as the communicant consumed the Host, thus preventing a major portion of the sacriligious loss on the floor.

Few today, including priests and many bishops realize the difference for respect for the Sacred Species. It used to be a firm rule of rubrics that after the priest, holding the the wafer between his thumb and forefinger with both hands, performed the consecration, he kept his thumb and forefinger of both hands firmly togethet, except to handle the Sacred Body, until he washed them over the chalice after Communion during the purification. If you have ever seen the large Mass Missals from those times, the pages that had to be turned during that part of the Mass had large tabs that could be grasped without using the thumb and forefinger. All this in respect for the Real Presence. One of the many other things, as an altar boy I was instructed that if some vomited after receiving Communion, that the result must be covered and protected until the priest with his annointed hands could come and clean it up. I was never aloud to touch the Sacred Vessels, all this out of respect for the Sacred Species, and as a demonstration to the world that Catholics truly believed that the Species was no longer bread, but is God. That demonstration is lacking totally today.
 
As always, I’m alarmed to see words like “sacrilege” and “totally lacking” in these forums. I am a big supporter of using a paten during distribution for all the reasons mentioned–tradition, reverence, catechesis-by-example, etc. But I have to advise that you look into new altar bread if you are really seeing so many problems with particles. Poorly made, outdated altar bread should simply not be used, and some would argue THAT is a sacrilege. If the priest actually consecrates enough hosts for all persons present at each Mass and the unconsecrated hosts are checked prior to being put into the ciboria it goes a long way toward eliminating this problem whether people receive in the hand or on the tongue. And in any case, I have a better chance of finding particles in my palm than particles in my beard.
 
One of the posters mentions about people who walk away with the Host in their hand. What about women who put the Host in their handbags??? Isn’t that a sacrilege?

I have been to Masses where they use the paten, but the server places the paten about crouch level. What good does that do.?
 
robin hood:
I have read Redemptionis Sacramentum recently and I am very fortunate that my parish is very good when it comes to the liturgy.
The only short falling as in most parishes in England is the non-use of the communion plate at communion.This is covered in paragraph 93 of the document where it says that the Communion plate is to be retained.
A Catholic newspaper in England raised a good question what do you do with the plate when people receive in the hand.
As I will be raising this matter in my own parish can any liturgical experts out their help me with this question.
That is a good point about the paten. I wasn’t even aware that New Masses had a paten for Communion because it has no use if there is hand Communion. Someone else said that it is a tradition… yes, receiving on the tongue is a Tradition, one much more important than a paten, so is facing east and not the people so is Latin, etc. but post Vat II had no problem destorying those. The only solution to the problem here is to get rid of hand Communion, which causes innumerable sacrileges everyday. God bless.
 
Well said, George Cooney. I think you have covered the need for a paten admirably. It is NOT a matter of keeping a tradition, but of due respect for the Eucharist. Be assured everyone, non-use of the paten lets the Host fall to the ground at every Mass, and it doesn’t matter if reception is on the tongue or in the hand, although in the hand greatly increases the risk of small particles being lost. As for the age of the bread, this has nothing to do with it. The new hosts are much less pressed (more crumbly) than the old ones were, and the loss from the old ones happened all the time nonetheless. The new hosts are worse in this regard no matter how old they are.
 
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GeorgeCooney:
…the rules for receiving in the hand state that the communicants must consume the Sacred Body in the presence of the priest (minister), and NOT walk away with the Host in their hands. I have NEVER seen that rule observed.
At our parish, to ensure the host is consumed, the ushers stand on either side of the communion line and make sure the communicant does not walk away before consuming the host.
 
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