Happy are you Poor by Dubay

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cholderby

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I have read this book about three times in the past month; it has truly changed my life. Since becoming a Catholic, I’ve read many books on religion, theology, living the word, etc. but I have never come across a book in my life that so completely changed the way I view society and my place in it.

Anyone else out there have a similar experience? What changes have you made in your life? What are your thoughts on the subject?

After reading the first couple of chapters, I was afraid because it seemed like the only “right” way to live was to own almost nothing (as Jesus did). Later in the book, of course, it goes on to talk about levels of poverty.

I’m a newlywed, so I don’t have total control over my finances, house etc. My husband hasn’t read the book and isn’t likely to do so anytime soon. I’ve made the changes that I can control, by donating an embarrassingly large amount of clothes to St. Vincent de Paul, cutting back on expensive groceries (cooking is my passion) and upping my contributions to church and other angencies. Before reading the book, I had been eating sushi on Fridays, which I knew even then wasn’t within the true spirit of the Friday fast. I’ve cut that out too, so that Friday truly is a fast and not just a day to consume expensive seafood! :eek:

I’d really like to hear other people’s reactions to this book!
 
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cholderby:
I have read this book about three times in the past month; it has truly changed my life. Since becoming a Catholic, I’ve read many books on religion, theology, living the word, etc. but I have never come across a book in my life that so completely changed the way I view society and my place in it.

Anyone else out there have a similar experience? What changes have you made in your life? What are your thoughts on the subject?

After reading the first couple of chapters, I was afraid because it seemed like the only “right” way to live was to own almost nothing (as Jesus did). Later in the book, of course, it goes on to talk about levels of poverty.

I’m a newlywed, so I don’t have total control over my finances, house etc. My husband hasn’t read the book and isn’t likely to do so anytime soon. I’ve made the changes that I can control, by donating an embarrassingly large amount of clothes to St. Vincent de Paul, cutting back on expensive groceries (cooking is my passion) and upping my contributions to church and other angencies. Before reading the book, I had been eating sushi on Fridays, which I knew even then wasn’t within the true spirit of the Friday fast. I’ve cut that out too, so that Friday truly is a fast and not just a day to consume expensive seafood! :eek:

I’d really like to hear other people’s reactions to this book!
I have not read it but Fr Dubay is a good retreat director so I am sure it is good. The fact you are moved to change something’s is evidence that it must be very good.

God Bless you on your journey of faith. It is a lifelong journey, as you grow, and we all do if we pray, read and learn and respond, we change what we can. Sounds like your doing very well.
 
I love this book, It Is one of my favourites.Father Dubay is such a clear and concise thinker.
Every time I shop I think do I really need this and I look at my clothes and although some are some years old there is nothing wrong with them.
Marie have you listened to Father Dubay’s archived programes on EWTN.The series Community Transformed is highly recommended.
God Bless.
 
I gave this book to my mom for Mother’s Day… so I’m waiting my turn! I skimmed it while I had it, and it looks like a really awesome book. I think it is definitely one of those that can be a life-changing type of book. I hope to read it very soon!
 
I just ordered a copy (from Catholic Answers!) and it should be here any day. I can’t wait to read it! Materialism is a temptation of mine that I need to deal with. I am hoping this book will help…

Ave Maria!
Amy
 
Traveling to the NC this summer. And always looking for “beach” reading…planning to order the book from Father Dubay. 👍
 
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Jyotl:
Traveling to the NC this summer. And always looking for “beach” reading…planning to order the book from Father Dubay. 👍
 
Oops! I didn’t see this post until after I started another thread on the same subject. I heard Fr. Dubay talk about this book on the radio and I was intrigued. I had read about “Poverty of Spirit” explained in the Navarre Bible Commentaries, but it just made it sound like you needed to be detached. I always wondered how you could be sure you were detached. I have never heard anything from the pulpit on the subject at all. I was raised in a family with a very tight budget. Frugality was a way of life for my family and everyone around us. I really didn’t think much about it. It was just the way it was. However, when I married a doctor who came from a family with money, I really started to question different views on the subject. Frankly, I’ve been very confused. It didn’t seem to me that either camp (opposing families) had the right idea. One side seemed to think you were not holy if you were successful and had money and the other side seemed to think you should work at being successful so you could be comfortable and secure and that you didn’t owe anything to people who weren’t willing to do the same. Although my husband was raised Catholic, he has pretty much embraced his family’s viewpoint rather than what the church might say on a subject. I didn’t think either family had it right and have been looking for an answer for quite sometime. I would get hints of how I should live from reading about the lives of the saints, but I still wasn’t clear on the subject. I also heard a bishop from Africa (talking with Fr. Pacwa) ask if Americans had forgotten about the call to an austere lifestyle? Forgotten, how about never even heard of the concept! Fr. Dubay’s book answered it all for me–most clearly. I can’t thank him enough for having the courage to speak out on the subject. I feel freer than I ever have. It will be a challenge to bring my husband around to this way of thinking, but at least I can get started with influencing the next generation in my children. Now when some salesperson tries to pressure me to buy the more expensive, superior product, I am perfectly content to tell them that I am willing to settle for the cheaper product so I can give the difference to the mission. My favorite line is when they try to convince me that I’m worth it. Well honey, my soul is worth a whole lot more. It gives me a sense of peace that money cannot buy.
 
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