Latin Help

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mschrank

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I am running into some difficulty in my latin learning. For example, in the first declension the case suffix for the genitive and dative (as well as others) are the same.

How do you tell which case is being used when suffixes are the same? I know this is probably an easy one, but since I’m teaching myself I have to ask.
 
I wish I had an answer for you - I am just learning too. I will try to remember to ask my kids’ Latin teacher - my son’s are learning Latin and Greek from first grade forward.

However, my 9 year old was just moved to this school and when I asked him he shrugged.

I will try to remember to consult the local expert.
 
I am running into some difficulty in my latin learning. For example, in the first declension the case suffix for the genitive and dative (as well as others) are the same.

How do you tell which case is being used when suffixes are the same? I know this is probably an easy one, but since I’m teaching myself I have to ask.
It’s a very reasonable question. In a word:

Context.

I’m not sure what book you’re using, but a good beginning text shouldn’t introduce the two at the same time; or at the very least shouldn’t introduce all the cases at the same time. (Running the risk of sounding extremely stupid, as I can’t recall whether Wheelock’s does this or not… but it’s not quite a beginner’s textbook.)

Usually it’ll be pretty clear from the rest of the sentence what’s an indirect object and what’s a possessive. (Hence: Puella feminae aquam dat is “The girl gives the woman water” as “The woman’s girl gives water” doesn’t make much sense.)

Also, as in the example above, indirect objects (dative) usually come just before the direct object whereas possessives (genitive) usually fall just after the noun they modify.
The presence of the verbs for “give” or “prepare” are pretty good indicators of an indirect object in the sentence…

You’ll be able to distinguish nominative plural because the verb will have to be plural as well…
 
Just remember, you asked for it. 😃

-peregrinator (who is sating her appetite for Latin grammar today)
 
Thank you! If it is context I must look to, then I will. I just was wondering if there was some technique that I wasn’t aware of.

And yeah, wheelock gives you 6 cases at once… all but the locative (dunno what it is, saw it on wikipedia).
 
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