Martyrs of Pratulyn

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Diak

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23 January/5 February

Martyrs of Podlasie ( Martyrs of Pratulyn)

Podlasie is an area in modern eastern Poland that, in the 18th century was governed by the Russian Empire. Russian sovereigns sought to bring all Eastern-rite Catholics into the Orthodox Church. Catherine II suppressed the Greek Catholic church in Ukraine in 1784. Nicholas I did the same in Belarus and Lithuania in 1839. Alexander II did the same in the Eparchy of Chelm in 1874, and officially suppressed the Eparchy in 1875. The bishop and the priests who refused to join the Orthodox Church were deported to Siberia or imprisoned. The laity, left on their own, had to defend their Church, their liturgy, and their union with Rome. On 24 January 1874 Tsarist soldiers entered the village of Pratulyn to transfer the parish to Orthodox control. Many of the faithful gathered to defend their parish and church. The soldiers tried to disperse the people, but failed. Their commander tried to bribe the parishioners to abandon Rome, but failed. He threaten them with assorted punishments, but this failed to move them.

Deciding that a show of force was needed, the commander ordered his troops to fire on the unarmed, hymn-singing laymen. Thirteen of the faithful died, most married men with families, ordinary men with great faith. We know almost nothing about their lives outside of this incident. Their families were not allowed to honor them or participate in the funerals, and the authorities hoped they would be forgotten. They were:
Wincenty (Vincent) Lewoniuk, 25 years old
Anicet Hryciuk, 19 years old
Bartlomiej Osypiuk, 30 years old
Daniel Karmasz, 48 years old
Filip Geryluk, 44 years old
Ignacy ranczuk, 50 yeares old
Jan Andrzejuk, 26 years old
Konstanty Bojko, 49 years old
Konstanty Lukaszuk, 45 years old
Lukasz Bojko, 22 years old
Maksym Hawryluk, 34 years old
Michal Wawryszuk, 21 years old
Onufry Wasyluk, 21 years old

On 6 October 1996, Pope John Paul II, beatified these 13 servants of God. In his homily he said, “‘The very stone which the builders rejected has become the head of the corner’ (Mt 21:42). It is upon Jesus Christ, the rock of salvation, that ‘the vineyard of the Lord of hosts’, ‘his cherished planting’ (Is 5:7), is rebuilt. God’s
cherished planting, dear brothers and sisters, were those whom today I have the joy of proclaiming blessed. They are men and women who gave a witness of unshakeable faith to the Owner of the vineyard. They did not disappoint him but, by remaining united to Christ like branches to the vine, they bore the awaited fruits of
conversion and holiness. They persevered, even at the cost of the supreme sacrifice.

‘The tenants took his servants and beat one, killed another and stoned another,’ (Mt 21:35).

Was this not the lot that befell Wincenty Lewoniuk and his companions, the martyrs of Podlasie? As faithful ‘servants’ of the Lord, they trusted in his grace and gave witness of their belonging to the Catholic Church in fidelity to their Eastern tradition. They did so with full awareness and did not hesitate to offer their lives as a confirmation of their loyalty to Christ. Not sparing themselves, the martyrs of Pratulyn defended not only the parish church in front of which they were killed, but the Church that Christ entrusted to the Apostle Peter, the Church which they felt a part of, like living stones. “They shed their blood in union with the Son of God, cast out of the vineyard and killed” (cf. Mt 21:39) for man’s salvation and reconciliation with God. By their example and intercession, Wincenty Lewonink and his 12 companions, who today are raised to the honours of the altar, invite us all to advance courageously on the way to the full unity of the entire family of Christ’s disciples, in the spirit of the ecumenical directives of the Second Vatican Council.”

http://www.kostomloty-parafia-unicka.siedlce.opoka.org.pl/z/meczennicy.jpg
Holy Martyrs of Pratulyn, pray for us!!!

n.b. A Moleben to the Martyrs can be found in English at www.catholicukes.org.au/tiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=401
FDRLB
 
Tropar, tone 4: Martyrs of Pratulyn! * Having entered into battle with a fierce enemy,* who desired to destroy your souls, * you were not intimidated by his threats,* but you heroically remained faithful to your church until death, * because you stood unshaken on the spiritual rock, who is Peter. * Having received the wreath of glory * from the sole Victor and Lord, * entreat Him, that we too be faithful to Christ’s Church.
 
Deciding that a show of force was needed, the commander ordered his troops to fire on the unarmed, hymn-singing laymen.

Sounds like how Josaphat Kuntsevich treated the Orthodox.
 
I don’t believe as a monastic St. Josaphat carried a gun; nor did he have civil authority to do such a thing. I would hope a commemoration of Catholic martyrs for the Union recognized by the Universal Church be respected and not responded to with an inflammatory polemic response.

I thought you indicated recently you attended a Catholic church.
FDRLB
 
Deciding that a show of force was needed, the commander ordered his troops to fire on the unarmed, hymn-singing laymen.

Sounds like how Josaphat Kuntsevich treated the Orthodox.
A smug person I suppose could say “Well I guess he got his!” when the hatchet was taken to him.

What the purpose of insinuating Saint Josaphat into this thread educating us about martyrs who died violent deaths while practicing no violence themselves, I cannot say. I have my suspicions on the motives, but in charity will not offer them. You could do that yourself if you wish… It may be best you did not.

Bls. Anicet Hryciuk, Bartlomiej Osypiuk, Daniel Karmasz, Filip Geryluk, Ignacy ranczuk, Jan Andrzejuk, Konstanty Bojko, Konstanty Lukaszuk, Lukasz Bojko, Maksym Hawryluk, Michal Wawryszuk, Onufry Wasyluk, pray for us.
 
My point is that in this sad, sad tale of the fratricidal war between the Orthodox and those of their brethren who sought to enter into communion with the Church of Rome, NEITHER SIDE has 100% clean hands.

There were horrors on both sides.

Lest one reads too much into my previous post, know that I’ve never had trouble with venerating our holy father Theodore Romzha as a holy hieromartyr. He gave his life for Christ and refused to abandon his flock. We commemorate him as one of our patrons at our hermitage.
 
My point is that in this sad, sad tale of the fratricidal war between the Orthodox and those of their brethren who sought to enter into communion with the Church of Rome, NEITHER SIDE has 100% clean hands.

There were horrors on both sides.

Lest one reads too much into my previous post, know that I’ve never had trouble with venerating our holy father Theodore Romzha as a holy hieromartyr. He gave his life for Christ and refused to abandon his flock. We commemorate him as one of our patrons at our hermitage.
If you mean only to make the point that there has been strife between Orthodox and Catholics, saying “Sounds like how Josaphat Kuntsevich treated the Orthodox.” is a funny way to do it.
 
My point is that in this sad, sad tale of the fratricidal war between the Orthodox and those of their brethren who sought to enter into communion with the Church of Rome, NEITHER SIDE has 100% clean hands.

There were horrors on both sides.

Lest one reads too much into my previous post, know that I’ve never had trouble with venerating our holy father Theodore Romzha as a holy hieromartyr. He gave his life for Christ and refused to abandon his flock. We commemorate him as one of our patrons at our hermitage.
Even trad Catholics like myself, who tend to be ecumenically challenged (cf. the encyclical Mortalium Animos), are not advocating the invocation of martyrs as a polemical act.

Nobody should have doubts that there have been fratricidal acts by individuals on both sides; and if anybody did, such names as “Jasenovac” should be enough to dispel them.

I don’t believe the martyrs were mentioned here with a polemical intent, and so would hope that the thread could proceed without any more dustups. Besides, when true martyrs die, they do so forgiving their adversaries in imitation of Jesus, a sublime example to remember now that both Latins and Byzantines are in Great Lent.
 
Deciding that a show of force was needed, the commander ordered his troops to fire on the unarmed, hymn-singing laymen. Thirteen of the faithful died, most married men with families, ordinary men with great faith.
Has the Orthodox Church ever condemned this act by the government? Or sought forgiveness from their Greek Catholic brethren for this act of the government?
Besides, when true martyrs die, they do so forgiving their adversaries in imitation of Jesus, a sublime example to remember now that both Latins and Byzantines are in Great Lent.
I agree with this statement. I have heard that some martyrs in the past would kiss the hands of their executioners who held the sword for the beheading. A true testimony to Christian martyrdom.

A devotion to these Holy Martyrs of Pratulyn should be an occasion for Byzantine Catholics to increase their love for their Orthodox brethren. It should increase the desire for a future full communion and reconciliation.

I’m not sure why, but for some reason I am reminded of this passage from Scripture: Genesis 50:16-21

So they sent a message to Joseph, saying, “Your father gave this command before he died, `Say to Joseph, Forgive, I pray you, the transgression of your brothers and their sin, because they did evil to you.’ And now, we pray you, forgive the transgression of the servants of the God of your father.” Joseph wept when they spoke to him. His brothers also came and fell down before him, and said, “Behold, we are your servants.” But Joseph said to them, “Fear not, for am I in the place of God? As for you, you meant evil against me; but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today. So do not fear; I will provide for you and your little ones.” Thus he reassured them and comforted them.​

God bless,

Rony
 
Has the Orthodox Church ever condemned this act by the government? Or sought forgiveness from their Greek Catholic brethren for this act of the government?
I have heard that some martyrs in the past would kiss the hands of their executioners who held the sword for the beheading. A true testimony to Christian martyrdom.
GREKO KATOLIK MARTYRS PATULLIN
FIRST NEW MARTYR, VLADIMIR KYIVSKIJ

As Orthodox believer, I am sorry such controversy has happened. These men were martyrs for Christ believing in their Church and Christ to death rather than change. It is horrible for us in contemporary moment to realize that such actions as to kill people for the benefit of their soul - such as inquisition, witch trials, actions of Iosofat Polotskij and of Tsarist army were considered quite normal and acceptable at the time. This is very sad for all Christians now. Also I do not know this town of Pattulin. Where is Patulin is it it in podles’je or podlashje?

Also 7 Feb is memory day of St. Vladimir, metropolit Kyivskij who was shot in 1918, first of new martyrs. St. Vladimir’s last words to his shooting Bolsheviks were - God, bless you and forgive you. This was truly beloved archpriest who was driven from metropolit of Petersburg by Rasputin, whom he opposed.
 
[Also I do not know this town of Pattulin. Where is Patulin is it it in podles’je or podlashje?
/QUOTE]
Volodymyr, the area is Podlashye in Eastern Poland (po Ukrainsku Підляхія). The selo is Pratulyn near the Polish/Belarus border.
Most of the Ukrainian Greek Catholics in that area and some Ukrainain Orthodox were later forceably relocated by the Polish government during Akcja Wisla after World War II.
FDRLB
 
Also I do not know this town of Pattulin. Where is Patulin is it it in podles’je or podlashje?
Sure, just do maps.google.com and type in Pratulin, Poland. It is located in the eastern part of Poland (Podlasie region) very close to the Bug River and the border with Bielarus
 
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