Prayer to Michael the Arch Angel

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Evelyn_s_Dad

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Does anyone have a good reason why we don’t pray to Michael at the end of the mass. My father states that they always did when he was growing up. I feel that it is very disturbing if the Devil has succeeded in disgusing his primary role as the enemy of good. Any comments
God Bless
 
Who doesn’t pray it after Mass?

I know I do… :angel1:
 
This prayer was never part of the Mass; it was said, by priest and congregation, after Low Mass, before the liturgical reform.

It was never said after High or Solemn High Mass (this last one, not the Low Mass, was the Church’s normative way of celebrating Mass).
 
Evelyn's Dad:
Does anyone have a good reason why we don’t pray to Michael at the end of the mass. My father states that they always did when he was growing up. I feel that it is very disturbing if the Devil has succeeded in disgusing his primary role as the enemy of good. Any comments
God Bless
I don’t understand why people can’t pray to God alone? All of the glory is God’s, why give it to another?
 
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Ric:
I don’t understand why people can’t pray to God alone? All of the glory is God’s, why give it to another?
Does this mean you would never, ever ask a friend of yours to pray for you? If you do ask them, are you giving your friends “Gods Glory” if you ask him/her to pray for you?

Perhaps these site’s can explain it more fully to you.You are confusing intercessory prayer with prayer to God.

cin.org/users/james/files/praying.htm

forums.catholic-questions.org/showthread.php?t=743
 
Ric,

We are not giving Glory to them, we are simply asking people and in this case an Archangel who are united with God in heaven, who have a closer relationship than we do at this moment to pray to the father for us, to intercede on our behalf. Hope that makes things clear.
 
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SwordofLight:
Could someone post the prayer? Thanks 🙂
Saint Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle. Be our safeguard against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray; and do you, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits who wander through the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Here is some good information on St. Michael who is guardian of the church.

newadvent.org/cathen/10275b.htm
 
Time and again I find that Protestants get hung up on the word “prayer”. The trouble is, they confuse it with “worship” which is for God alone.

Prayer is just a way of talking to someone who is with you spiritually instead of physically. I pray to my grandfather who died several years ago, but no one could ever confuse it with worship. I ask him to pray for me, meaning to ask God to bless me and my family. Not every prayer to God has to be inherently worshipful (although perhaps it should be!)

Hope this helps, Ric.
 
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SwordofLight:
Could someone post the prayer? Thanks 🙂
Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio, contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae coelestis, Satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute, in infernum detrude. Amen.

Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle;
be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil.
May God rebuke him, we humbly pray, and do thou, oh prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God thrust into Hell Satan, and all the evil spirits who wander through the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

:angel1:
 
Strictly speaking, the word “worship” simply means to “honor.”

When you respect and honor people like civic authorites (judges, monarchs, predisents, etc.) or celebreties, you are, strictly speaking, worshipping them.

The honor given to God difers from that given to the saints, not because only God is worshipped, but because only God is given a certain form of worship:* latria*.

Latria as worship is equivalent to “sacrifice.” Sacrifice can only be offered to God.Other forms of worship (dulia) can be given to men. But only latria to God.

This distinction is a Biblical one.

Where do you think the word idolatry comes from?

🙂
 
Well, DV, as far as Worship goes, my dictionary continually specifies “as a diety”, not just simply to honor. :bowdown2:

Besides, why are you trying to add to Ric’s misgivings! :rolleyes:
 
Well, DV, as far as Worship goes, my dictionary continually specifies “as a diety”, not just simply to honor.
Get a more comprehensive dictionary. Seriously. 🙂
Besides, why are you trying to add to Ric’s misgivings!
I’m preparing Ric for the fact that many older Catholic resources, like the Catholic Encyclopedia or John Hardon’s Catholic Catechism refer, unapologetically, to the “worship” of Mary, the Saint, images, relics, etc.

If its any consolation, this archaic usage occurs in many other older English works, Protestant and secular. For example, the writings of Shakespeare, the address to English monarchs and judges (i.e. “Your Worship” like the American “Your Honor”), and even old Proestant liturgies! For example, in many of the old Anglican wedding service-books, when the groom gives the ring to the bride, he says:
With this ring, I thee worship.
When I first investigated Catholicism, I wish I had this information handy. Thought it might help out Ric.
 
Back to the discussion at hand, while my parish doesn’t say the prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, many in my area do.

My son and I pray this prayer every morning before we get out of bed, and then we offer our day to Jesus. We refer to it as “putting on our armor.” I have it on my PC desktop as wallpaper, too.

'thann
 
From EWTN:
One of the purposes of the liturgical renewal of the Second Vatican Council was to instill in the faithful a proper sense of the liturgy.
Among the ways this renewal was effected was to restore active participation to the laity, by emphasizing the liturgical prayers and actions that are proper to them (and which were often done by the servers or choir in their name), and, to remove elements from the Mass which were devotional, rather than liturgical (part of the Mass proper). Among the non-liturgical elements that were removed were the Prayers at the end of the Mass, including the Prayer to St. Michael. In this way the common liturgical celebration ends with the dismissal proper to the Mass.
In 1994 Pope John Paul II requested the faithful to take up again the praying of the Prayer to St. Michael in the battle of our times “against the forces of darkness and against the spirit of this world.”
This request could certainly be answered by individuals or small groups, such as prayer groups. However, it is even more appropriate if the People of God are united in fulfilling this request. The one time when this can be done is when “everyone” is gathered for the Sacred Liturgy.

In light of the liturgical norms, it becomes problematic, however, if the whole assembly, led by the celebrant, prays it in apparent continuation of the liturgical action just completed. Once the celebrant processes out, though, the Mass is clearly ended. It is no more contradictory for the assembly to join in the Prayer to St. Michael, then it is to break up and depart, as either action is now distinct from the Mass. In the same way, the rosary said immediately before Mass by the faithful, but not incorporated into its beginning, does not contravene the distinction between liturgy and devotion.
 
I might be way off, but if I remeber correctly

The prayer to St. Michael the Archangel, was written and attached to the end of the mass by Pope Leo XIII.

It might have been recited before the benediction.

The prayer was not ‘thrown out’ with Vatican II. It just should not be recited prior to the Benediction. which is why may parishes recite it after the benediction and dismissal. :twocents: 😃
 
Do Catholics believe in the choir hierarchy of angels?

Seraphim, Cherubrim, Thrones …, Archangel, Angel
 
Yes, we were discussing this in another forum and how Pope Leo XIII’s (supposedly) had a vision of a battle between St. Michael and Satan in the future Church; and it was through this vision which had lead him to compose these prayers and had them said after a Low Mass.

We still retain the practice here after our Low Masses (Mass unsung in the old rite) and I think it’s a good idea to have it brought back; we need the help of St. Michael and the angels more then ever.

Yes, Shilbboleth, we believe in the nine angelic choirs of angels; though its non binding on the faithful it is a belief that has been passed down by the Church through various theologians like St. Thomas Aquinas.

The nine choirs are:

Seraphim,
Cherubim,
Thrones
Dominations,
Virtues,
Powers,
Principalities,
Archangels,
and Angels
 
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