Protestant Missing Books

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Homerun40968

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I’m a protestant and am clearly missing the lesson of the 7 books that Martin Luther removed. Could someone give me an overview of each book and briefly explain the moral story or big picture contained in it? Thank you.
 
Wisdom of Solomon and Wisdom of Sirach are both a lot like Proverbs, so hard to summarise as they are a lot of sayings. Wisdom of Solomon though has a lot of sayings and passages that are used in the New Testament. It is especially apparent in Chapter 2 of St Paul’s Epistle to the Romans about all people having some in-built knowledge of God and thus no excuse for not following it. Also Chapter 2 of the Wisdom of Solomon is about a Son of God who was tortured and killed shamefully by people who found his teachings hard to follow, and says if he is really God’s Son then God will rescue him. Well worth reading that chapter.

1 and 2 Maccabees basically carry on the history where Ezra/Nehemiah leaves off, and is especially about the struggles of the Jews against their Greek oppressors. 1 Maccabees is over a long time and more from a pure historical point of view, whereas 2 Maccabees focuses on one particular time and is from more of a religious point of view. It also features many Catholic doctrines, but also many general Christian ones that have only a few mentions in the rest of the Old Testament. The doctrines include prayer for the dead, intercession of Saints, bodily resurrection of the dead and final judgment.

Tobit is about a man (Tobias) who is helped by the angel Raphael when going to get some money from on deposit for his blind father (Tobit), and to marry a girl who has been harassed by a demon and had 7 husbands murdered by the demon. The angel helps him defeat the demon and heal his father. Though it also has a lot of moral teachings in it especially the value of helping the poor and almsgiving, which Tobit is very focused on, he also helps bury people that are killed by the authorities. Also has very Catholic tones to it, though less obviously than 2 Maccabees.

Judith is about a woman who rescues the Jews from an attacking Assyrian army general called Holofernes, by getting him drunk and pretends she’s going to sleep with him then cuts off his head. Possibly not the best means for a good end, but very similar to the story of Jael who was celebrated as a hero in the Old Testament but on a bigger scale.

Baruch is basically your standard OT prophet from just after Jerusalem was taken by the Babylonians, encouraging Israel to righteousness and promising deliverance. It ends with a letter from Jeremiah warning Israel not to be led astray by the Babylonian idols.

Also Daniel and Esther are bigger. Esther has the same story but mentions God in it, and also reveals that the baddy Haman is a Macedonian trying to usurp the Persian Empire. Daniel includes an extra prayer, plus a story of Daniel rescuing a woman called Susanna who has been set up by some pervy elders who accused her of adultery for not sleeping with them. Also it has Daniel condemning the worship of an idol called Bel and a dragon, and how he proves that they are fake Gods to the king.

I find that the books help link the Old and New Testaments and much more clearly show Christian (especially Catholic/Orthodox) doctrine, in my opinion why the Jews excluded most of them
 
Tobit is about a man (Tobias) who is helped by the angel Raphael when going to get some money from on deposit for his blind father (Tobit), and to marry a girl who has been harassed by a demon and had 7 husbands murdered by the demon. The angel helps him defeat the demon and heal his father. Though it also has a lot of moral teachings in it especially the value of helping the poor and almsgiving, which Tobit is very focused on, he also helps bury people that are killed by the authorities. Also has very Catholic tones to it, though less obviously than 2 Maccabees.
Jesus made a reference to Tobit in the NT but I cannot remember the passage. When discussing with the Pharisees He mentioned on passing the seven husbands story.

Wisdom also is one of the few OT books that talks about the punshiment and rewards after death.
 
Note that Wisdom 2:10-20 is one of the most explicit prophecies of the Messiah:
Let us oppress the righteous poor man; let us not spare the widow nor regard the gray hairs of the aged. 11 But let our might be our law of right, for what is weak proves itself to be useless. 12 “Let us lie in wait for the righteous man, because he is inconvenient to us and opposes our actions; he reproaches us for sins against the law, and accuses us of sins against our training. 13 He professes to have knowledge of God, and calls himself a child* of the Lord. 14 He became to us a reproof of our thoughts; 15 the very sight of him is a burden to us, because his manner of life is unlike that of others, and his ways are strange. 16 We are considered by him as something base, and he avoids our ways as unclean; he calls the last end of the righteous happy, and boasts that God is his father. 17 Let us see if his words are true, and let us test what will happen at the end of his life; 18 for if the righteous man is God’s son, he will help him, and will deliver him from the hand of his adversaries. 19 Let us test him with insult and torture, that we may find out how gentle he is, and make trial of his forbearance. 20 Let us condemn him to a shameful death, for, according to what he says, he will be protected.”
 
To the OP:
You can download the King James version of the missing books that were in the original AV1611 until the 1800s on line here:

That for the Book of Wisdom:

etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/toccer-new2?id=KjvSolo.sgm&images=images/modeng&data=/texts/english/modeng/parsed&tag=public&part=all

The others are also in line too.

The same passage, KJV:
12: Therefore let us lie in wait for the righteous; because he is not for our turn, and he is clean contrary to our doings: he upbraideth us with our offending the law, and objecteth to our infamy the transgressings of our education.
13: He professeth to have the knowledge of God: and he calleth himself the child of the Lord.
14: He was made to reprove our thoughts.
15: He is grievous unto us even to behold: for his life is not like other men’s, his ways are of another fashion.
16: We are esteemed of him as counterfeits: he abstaineth from our ways as from filthiness: he pronounceth the end of the just to be blessed, and maketh his boast that God is his father.
17: Let us see if his words be true: and let us prove what shall happen in the end of him.
18: For if the just man be the son of God, he will help him, and deliver him from the hand of his enemies.
19: Let us examine him with despitefulness and torture, that we may know his meekness, and prove his patience.
20: Let us condemn him with a shameful death: for by his own saying he shall be respected.
21: Such things they did imagine, and were deceived: for their own wickedness hath blinded them.
22: As for the mysteries of God, they knew them not: neither hoped they for the wages of righteousness, nor discerned a reward for blameless souls.
23: For God created man to be immortal, and made him to be an image of his own eternity.
24: Nevertheless through envy of the devil came death into the world: and they that do hold of his side do find it.
 
I’m a protestant and am clearly missing the lesson of the 7 books that Martin Luther removed. Could someone give me an overview of each book and briefly explain the moral story or big picture contained in it? Thank you.
***Hi, Homerun!

…if you would like a professional rendering I can scan the material send it to you (not sure how the site’s attachment works but I can try)… let me know if you want it.

Maran atha!

Angel***
 
Wow, these are very good explanations. I’m starting to study the scriptures more seriously and trying to connect the OT and NT, so this is wonderful.
 
Wisdom also is one of the few OT books that talks about the punshiment and rewards after death.
From memory the others that do are Isaiah, 2 Maccabees and Judith. Though I may be missing a couple.
 
I’m a protestant and am clearly missing the lesson of the 7 books that Martin Luther removed. Could someone give me an overview of each book and briefly explain the moral story or big picture contained in it? Thank you.
there is a great book out there called"Introducing the Apocrypha" by David de Silva. He’s not Catholic but it is a fair and unbaised look at the books that have been too easily written off. Good Luck:thumbsup: !
 
Note that Wisdom 2:10-20 is one of the most explicit prophecies of the Messiah: Let us oppress the righteous poor man; let us not spare the widow nor regard the gray hairs of the aged. 11 But let our might be our law of right, for what is weak proves itself to be useless. 12 “Let us lie in wait for the righteous man, because he is inconvenient to us and opposes our actions; he reproaches us for sins against the law, and accuses us of sins against our training. 13 He professes to have knowledge of God, and calls himself a child* of the Lord. 14 He became to us a reproof of our thoughts; 15 the very sight of him is a burden to us, because his manner of life is unlike that of others, and his ways are strange. 16 We are considered by him as something base, and he avoids our ways as unclean; he calls the last end of the righteous happy, and boasts that God is his father. 17 Let us see if his words are true, and let us test what will happen at the end of his life; 18 for if the righteous man is God’s son, he will help him, and will deliver him from the hand of his adversaries. 19 Let us test him with insult and torture, that we may find out how gentle he is, and make trial of his forbearance. 20 Let us condemn him to a shameful death, for, according to what he says, he will be protected.”
:eek:

My Lord and My God…
 
From memory the others that do are Isaiah, 2 Maccabees and Judith. Though I may be missing a couple.
To my knowledge Maccabees and Judith are also missing from Protestant Bibles too.
No wonder that heresies that deny the afterlife like the SDAs and the JW came from groups that use the protestant canon.
 
To bad that verse doesn’t get read in Mass.

Is that the most clearest and detailed prophecy of Jesus in scripture?

Why don’t our bibles have cross references of Jesus prophecies the way the NIV has? I know some of our bibles do, but most I see do not.
 
To bad that verse doesn’t get read in Mass.

Is that the most clearest and detailed prophecy of Jesus in scripture?
Here’s my most favorate passage: Isaiah’s Suffering Servant (52:13 thru 53:12–NAB)

Is 52
13 (3) See, my servant shall prosper, he shall be raised high and greatly exalted. 14 Even as many were amazed at him - so marred was his look beyond that of man, and his appearance beyond that of mortals - 15 So shall he startle many nations, because of him kings shall stand speechless; For those who have not been told shall see, those who have not heard shall ponder it.

Is 53
1 Who would believe what we have heard? To whom has the arm of the LORD been revealed? 2 (1) He grew up like a sapling before him, like a shoot from the parched earth; There was in him no stately bearing to make us look at him, nor appearance that would attract us to him. 3 (2) He was spurned and avoided by men, a man of suffering, accustomed to infirmity, One of those from whom men hide their faces, spurned, and we held him in no esteem. 4 (3) Yet it was our infirmities that he bore, our sufferings that he endured, While we thought of him as stricken, as one smitten by God and afflicted. 5 But he was pierced for our offenses, crushed for our sins, Upon him was the chastisement that makes us whole, by his stripes we were healed. 6 We had all gone astray like sheep, each following his own way; But the LORD laid upon him the guilt of us all. 7 Though he was harshly treated, he submitted and opened not his mouth; Like a lamb led to the slaughter or a sheep before the shearers, he was silent and opened not his mouth. 8 Oppressed and condemned, he was taken away, and who would have thought any more of his destiny? When he was cut off from the land of the living, and smitten for the sin of his people, 9 A grave was assigned him among the wicked and a burial place with evildoers, Though he had done no wrong nor spoken any falsehood. 10 (4) (But the LORD was pleased to crush him in infirmity.) If he gives his life as an offering for sin, he shall see his descendants in a long life, and the will of the LORD shall be accomplished through him. 11 Because of his affliction he shall see the light in fullness of days; Through his suffering, my servant shall justify many, and their guilt he shall bear. 12 Therefore I will give him his portion among the great, and he shall divide the spoils with the mighty, Because he surrendered himself to death and was counted among the wicked; And he shall take away the sins of many, and win pardon for their offenses.​

52:13 (3) (⇒ 52:13-⇒ 53:12) The last of the four “Servant-of-the-Lord” oracles. An extraordinary description of the sinless Servant, who by his voluntary suffering atones for the sins of his people, and saves them from just punishment at the hands of God. Only in Jesus Christ is the prophecy perfectly fulfilled.

13:1 (2) Only God appreciated his Servant’s true greatness.
13:2 (3) Because he suffered, he was regarded as a sinner and therefore as one to be spurned.
13:3 (4-6) He did indeed suffer but it was for the sins of mankind, and through his sufferings men are healed.
13:4 (10-12) Because he fulfilled the divine will by suffering for the sins of others, the Servant will be rewarded by the Lord. See the light: enjoy happiness. This line may originally have read, “he shall drink and eat to the full” - at the thanksgiving sacrifice at which he shall divide the spoils (⇒ 53:12).
Why don’t our bibles have cross references of Jesus prophecies the way the NIV has? I know some of our bibles do, but most I see do not.
I do not understand that either… if can, you get yourself a copy of the Jerusalem Bible, French Ed; les Editions du Cerf, Paris, 1973–I have the Spanish version (1975), it has huge concordance and notes!

Here are the references to Wisdom 2:10-20
(10) Lev 25:35-37; Ex 22:21; Lev 19:22
(12) Jr 11:19; 20:10-13; Jn 5:16, 18; Mt 26:3-4; Mt 23
(13) Mt 11:27; Ws 5:5
(14) Lk 22:70
(15) Esth 3:8, 13
(16) Mt 5:11; Jn 5:18
(18) Psl 22:9; Mt 27:43
(19) Is 53:7; Mt 26:57-58; 27:12

Maran atha!

Angel
 
Another prophetic reference in Wisdom:

Wisdom 3

AV 1611 version:
For whoso despiseth wisdom and nurture, he is miserable, and their hope is vain, their labours unfruitful, and their works unprofitable:
12: Their wives are foolish, and their children wicked:
13: Their offspring is cursed. **Wherefore blessed is the barren that is undefiled, which hath not known the sinful bed: she shall have fruit in the visitation of souls. **
DR version:
But the souls of the just are in the hand of God, and the torment of death shall not touch them.
2
In the sight of the unwise they seemed to die: and their departure was taken for misery:
3
And their going away from us, for utter destruction: but they are in peace.
4
And though in the sight of men they suffered torments, their hope is full of immortality.
5
Afflicted in few things, in many they shall be well rewarded: because God hath tried them, and found them worthy of himself.
6
As gold in the furnace he hath proved them, and as a victim of a holocaust he hath received them, and in time there shall be respect had to them.
7
The just shall shine, and shall run to and fro like sparks among the reeds.
8
They shall judge nations, and rule over people, and their Lord shall reign for ever.
9
They that trust in him, shall understand the truth: and they that are faithful in love shall rest in him: for grace and peace is to his elect.
10
But the wicked shall be punished according to their own devices: who have neglected the just, and have revolted from the Lord.
11
For he that rejecteth wisdom, and discipline, is unhappy: and their hope is vain, and their labours without fruit, and their works unprofitable.
12
Their wives are foolish, and their children wicked.
13
Their offspring is cursed: for happy is the barren: and the undefiled, that hath not known bed in sin: she shall have fruit in the visitation of holy souls.
 
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