Sustain life at all costs?

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I’m reading a book called The Creed by Luke Timothy Johnson. He says that he’s Catholic. Basically, I bought the book because I wanted a commentary on the Nicene Creed and its historical development. But the beginning is a bunch of theological mumbo-jumbo and here’s a quote:
If Christians believe that the church is catholic, they should welcome diversity within the church. If they believe “in the resurrection of the body and life everlasting,” then they should not act as if sustaining mortal life at all costs is a supreme good.
I don’t quite know how to take the first sentence, but I thought we were to sustain life whenever it is possible.
 
No. We teach that life is precious at any stage, and in any state. But we do not deny individuals the right to die with Christian human dignity. See the Catechism on refusing medical care, or the Church’s doctrinal note on Euthanasia:

vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_19800505_euthanasia_en.html
“Today it is very important to protect, at the moment of death, both the dignity of the human person and the Christian concept of life, against a technological attitude that threatens to become an abuse. Thus some people speak of a ‘right to die,’ which is an expression that does not mean the right to procure death either by one’s own hand or by means of someone else, as one pleases, but rather the right to die peacefully with human and Christian dignity. From this point of view, the use of therapeutic means can sometimes pose problems. In numerous cases, the complexity of the situation can be such as to cause doubts about the way ethical principles should be applied. In the final analysis, it pertains to the conscience either of the sick person, or of those qualified to speak in the sick person’s name, or of the doctors, to decide, in the light of moral obligations and of the various aspects of the case.”
As for the rest, it is hard to tell from a snippet, but the meaning of Catholic and Apostolic Church are covered in Part I of the Catechism and the author seems to be using a different definition.
 
As SoCalRC stated, “at all costs” is not Catholic teaching. As to the rest of the book and its contents, does the book have an imprimatur and nihil obstat?
 
No, it doesn’t have an impimatur and nihil obstat. Like I mentioned, I really only wanted a book that discussed the development of the Nicene Creed…such as any parts of it that were formulated specifically to refute a heresy at the time, and what role the early church had in developing the creed. I realize that the catechism covers the doctrinal material.

If it means anything to you, its published by Doubleday.
 
No, it doesn’t have an impimatur and nihil obstat. Like I mentioned, I really only wanted a book that discussed the development of the Nicene Creed…such as any parts of it that were formulated specifically to refute a heresy at the time, and what role the early church had in developing the creed. I realize that the catechism covers the doctrinal material.

If it means anything to you, its published by Doubleday.
Well, the Creed is doctrinal so any “explanation” would necessarily entail doctrine. The lack of imprimatur and nihil obstat would deter me from buying it. There are books on the Creed and on the heresies of the Church that have the credentials to ensure they include solid teaching.
 
I’m

I don’t quite know how to take the first sentence, but I thought we were to sustain life whenever it is possible.
that is not Catholic doctrine, we are to provide normal means of life support, hydration, nutrition etc., but are not required to resort to extraordinary means to maintain life if natural death is imminant.
 
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