The Bible says don't eat with Christian drunks, fornicators, etc.???

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sabrinaofmn

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I Cor. 5:11 “But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat.”

This has always been a hard one for me because I have never seen anything taught on it in terms of application. Does “brother” refer to any professing Christian? If so, the list of people that I would need to stay away from would be rather lengthy. My husband always says that it only applies to “true” Christians, not just people who would check Christian on a box on a form, as opposed to say checking Muslim or Atheist.

I did put this into practice once. I had a “true” Christian friend who was an active Christian. She even held a Bible study in her home. She was basically living with her fiance, and I wrote her a letter to tell her that I could no longer associate with her because of the above verse. Of course, I never heard from her again, and no doubt, she thought I was a freak.

Does anyone have any thoughts as to the application of the above verse, and has anyone put it into practice?
 
Not sure about interpreting this passage. I’ll leave that to someone more knowledgable than me.

I was once told by a great priest to “follow your friend to the gates of hell, but not beyond.” I took this to mean that we are called to keep relationships alive with these people in order to be the light of Christ in their lives. IF however, we begin to be tempted or fall into their sinfulness, that is when we ought to cut ties.

I think the reasoning here is that if you stop interacting to a person who has fallen away from the truth how can you help to bring them back. Obviously, there other considerations as well. You cannot give scandal and must be particularly mindful of not giving scandal to any children who might be involved.
 
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sabrinaofmn:
I Cor. 5:11 “But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat.”

This has always been a hard one for me because I have never seen anything taught on it in terms of application. Does “brother” refer to any professing Christian?
Yes, that’s exactly what it means. In the previous verse he said that he was not referring to people in the world; otherwise, we would have to leave the world.

DaveBj
 
On the one hand, we wouldn’t be very good evangelists if we refused to associate with everyone who was not following Christ’s teachings. On the other hand, there are some legitimate reasons why we would want to break off association with certain people.
  1. Scandal: if our association implies approval of their behavior to a reasonable person, then it is a problem.
  2. Occasion of sin: if we are incurring too great a risk of falling into the sin, then we should stay away. If I knew someone who lived with his/her boyfriend, this is not a temptation for me to do the same thing. Therefore, I might hang around hoping to help bring the Gospel to that person.
  3. Being an enabler: some people enable a person to continue in their sin by being around that person. We may wish to be in someone’s company on the grounds of “being there to help” when in fact we are only allowing the sin to continue.
David
 
I had a discussion like this with my priest recently.

My brother has fallen away from the Church, got married in an Anglican church, his two children arent baptised at all etc etc.

My priest told me not to hound them about coming back to the Church, or trying to convert my sister-in-law.

Rather, he said, to be an example to them of what it is like to follow Jesus.

Not in words, but by deeds. He said they should see I have no need for money or possessions.

Actually they quite often ask me why I dont do this or do that , as in getting a good paid job.

They have brand new cars, are building a new house etc.

My priest said with lots of prayer they will realise and want to know why I dont need for any of that.

Then hopefully they will convert and come back home.

I think we are supposed to eat with the non-believers to a degree, to show them what it is like to be walking with Jesus.

Love Kellie
 
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sabrinaofmn:
I Cor. 5:11 “But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat.”

Does anyone have any thoughts as to the application of the above verse, and has anyone put it into practice?
I’ve heard this discussed before. As I understand it the “any man that is called a brother” bit referred to a member of the local assembly, i.e. church. For this “brother” to behave in such a manner would be a scandal to all believers…professing faith in Christ, and yet blatantly disregarding Christian behavior. We are true Christians not when we know Christ’s teachings, but when we “observe” them (Matt 28:20). This “brother” is showing a lack of integrity, and until he comes around, the believers were to let him know that he was cutting himself off from the Christian community through his behavior.

In our country with the plurality of faiths and fluid communities, it’s tough to pull this one off, unless maybe you live in a small town and most folks go to the same church. I’ve never put it into practice myself.
 
This must be balanced with the fact that Jesus ate wich just these very people…I think the advice is conditional in that not all can eat with such people without themselves falling into the vice…The letter to the corintians was apparently written to people that were eager in their faith but not very strong and of weak wills
 
I guess that in a sense Jesus would be in violation of 1 Cor. 5:11.
If I were to abide by this verse, I would be drinking and eating by myself, for the rest of my life.
Today there are so many Catholic couples living together, that many priests are at a loss as what to do when these couples approach the Church, asking for the bands of matrimony. And some priests could care less.
I had a priest tell me there are worse sins than having sex outside of marriage.
 
I am first time visiting this nice forum, my freinds are alwasys asking me for the good recourses to read out and now I am gonna suggest them this nice one
 
I Cor. 5:11 “But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat.”

This has always been a hard one for me because I have never seen anything taught on it in terms of application. Does “brother” refer to any professing Christian? If so, the list of people that I would need to stay away from would be rather lengthy. My husband always says that it only applies to “true” Christians, not just people who would check Christian on a box on a form, as opposed to say checking Muslim or Atheist.

I did put this into practice once. I had a “true” Christian friend who was an active Christian. She even held a Bible study in her home. She was basically living with her fiance, and I wrote her a letter to tell her that I could no longer associate with her because of the above verse. Of course, I never heard from her again, and no doubt, she thought I was a freak.

Does anyone have any thoughts as to the application of the above verse, and has anyone put it into practice?
You shouldn’t mix with people if you think they are a temptations. But Jesus mixed and ate with sinners. Sometimes people may need your help.

“The Son of man is come eating and drinking; and ye say, Behold a gluttonous man, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners!” Luke 7:34.
 
I Cor. 5:11 “But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat.”
This is a problem for me, too. It seems to me that “eating with sinners” implies approval. But, in the gospel, Jesus “eats with sinners”, so we are supposed to go ahead and do the same. We aren’t supposed to be sinners but it is okay to eat with them.

I have family who are involved with others in a nonCatholic way. My intention is to set them a good example by showing them that it is easy to avoid involvement by refusing social invitations by such ‘sinners’. However, the family interpretation is that I am being judgmental and unChristian. My approach is not having the desired effect.

My other option, more hidden, is to pray for them all.
 
I Cor. 5:11 “But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat.”
On the other hand, the Catholic Church is called “Church of sinners” meaning we are all sinners in need of Confession and conversion. I may not want to keep company with persons guilty of a particular type of sin but what about me? My sins may be different but wouldn’t they equally justify another’s refusal to “eat with” me?
 
I am no expert, but could this be a reference to prohibiting the fallen away from partaking of the Eucharist?
 
My take : Perhaps for a drunk friend - eat with them , offer to take them home etc but DON’T buy them a drink! Liasing with people is not approving , hate the sin not the sinner , enjoy their company if you can , or offer them consolation (people sometimes turn to drink to shield their suffering) there is more to a person than their sins and the worst sinner can be saved if they repent even at their last breath. That’s the theory (i think) putting into practice is a different thing … takes a saint
 
I Cor. 5:11 “But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat.”

This has always been a hard one for me because I have never seen anything taught on it in terms of application. Does “brother” refer to any professing Christian? If so, the list of people that I would need to stay away from would be rather lengthy. My husband always says that it only applies to “true” Christians, not just people who would check Christian on a box on a form, as opposed to say checking Muslim or Atheist.

I did put this into practice once. I had a “true” Christian friend who was an active Christian. She even held a Bible study in her home. She was basically living with her fiance, and I wrote her a letter to tell her that I could no longer associate with her because of the above verse. Of course, I never heard from her again, and no doubt, she thought I was a freak.

Does anyone have any thoughts as to the application of the above verse, and has anyone put it into practice?
Now that’s exactly what the Pharisees accused Jesus of.
 
Get off my back
What?..I questioned your interpretation of that being in reference to keeping those in sin from receiving the Eucharist. Then said the experts are the theologians.

I think an apology is in order.
 
What?..I questioned your interpretation of that being in reference to keeping those in sin from receiving the Eucharist. Then said the experts are the theologians.

I think an apology is in order.
From you for the continuous string of arrogant insults directed towards me
 
From you for the continuous string of arrogant insults directed towards me
Actually…I’ve already apologized to the many protestants that you’ve insulted. And Catholics for that matter.

Would you like me to reference your posts. They’re quite belligerent.

And…where was the insult in the you commented on. Are you an apologist?
 
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