TV masses

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After reading another forum thread about TV masses, I got to wondering **What is the point of a TV mass? ** It does not fulfill one’s Sunday obligation. If one is ill, one is excused from mass so one does not have to watch one on TV. Is it for apologetic purposes? Is it a sort of sacramental? Can it be some sort of private devotion? Is it just a good practice to watch a TV mass if one cannot get to mass because of, say a storm, or unavoidable travel? I have done the latter though I realize it was not the same as attending a mass in person. What is the theological/liturgical status of TV masses?
 
Well, the priest celebrating it and the people assisting and in the congregation are certainly attending a ‘real’ Mass. That ‘real’ Mass is then televised.

You are correct; the ‘watching’ of a Mass on TV does not ‘substitute’ for one’s obligation to attend Mass, if one is able.

But for those who are not able, particularly for those in the community where it is televised who are elderly, and homebound, to have a “televised” Mass where they can see ‘their’ priest, and their friends, would certainly be a blessing, don’t you think? And for those may be discerning the Catholic faith, to be able to ‘watch’ a televised Mass may help them to feel more comfortable about ‘what goes on’ before they step into a church on their own. It may be a ‘reminder’ to the lapsed Catholic and help him/her to journey back to the faith.
 
After reading another forum thread about TV masses, I got to wondering **What is the point of a TV mass? ** It does not fulfill one’s Sunday obligation. If one is ill, one is excused from mass so one does not have to watch one on TV. Is it for apologetic purposes? Is it a sort of sacramental? Can it be some sort of private devotion? Is it just a good practice to watch a TV mass if one cannot get to mass because of, say a storm, or unavoidable travel? I have done the latter though I realize it was not the same as attending a mass in person. What is the theological/liturgical status of TV masses?
AFAIK, there is no theological or liturgical status for TV Masses. EWTN broadcasts daily Mass for evangelical reasons and for personal enrichment. Seeing the Mass properly celebrated can certainly be educational for some and being exposed to Mass more frequently would, IMO, be beneficial.
 
This is what Pius XII said on the occasion of the first television program on a European network
…we are thinking in particular of those of you whom sickness or infirmity confine to your homes, and those who would like to find the comfort and consolation they need more than others by being present in spirit at religious ceremonies and uniting their prayer to that of the Church. From now on, television, better than radio will bring them into the sanctuary. This will not of course, take the place of being present actually and in person at religious rites; but at least it will help create the atmosphere of reverence and recollection that surrounds liturgical action, and bring the audience to share in the fervent prayer of faith and adoration that rises heavenwards from a gathering of the faithful.
 
I’ve often wondered how one ‘watching’ the TV Mass would ‘watch’. Would they participate as they would if they were really at Mass? To what extent (responses, kneeling, etc)? Or would one just simply watch, like any other program?
 
I’ve often wondered how one ‘watching’ the TV Mass would ‘watch’. Would they participate as they would if they were really at Mass? To what extent (responses, kneeling, etc)? Or would one just simply watch, like any other program?
My guess is that most of the people that watch the Mass are infirms and so I would guess that they just sit or lay in bed.
 
After reading another forum thread about TV masses, I got to wondering **What is the point of a TV mass? **It does not fulfill one’s Sunday obligation. If one is ill, one is excused from mass so one does not have to watch one on TV. Is it for apologetic purposes? Is it a sort of sacramental? Can it be some sort of private devotion? Is it just a good practice to watch a TV mass if one cannot get to mass because of, say a storm, or unavoidable travel? I have done the latter though I realize it was not the same as attending a mass in person. What is the theological/liturgical status of TV masses?
They are nice for those who are homebound who cannot get to Mass to hear the readings, a homily, and see the liturgy. It’s not the same of being at Mass, but it’s got to be worth something. It’s also nice to see reverently celebrated Masses if you come from a place that reverence is almost unheard of.
 
I love it. 👍 I can’t attend daily Mass b/c of my work schedule. I pray the rosary with Mother Angelica at 6:30 and then listen to Mass at 7 am while I’m at work. It’s such a nice way to start my day. I don’t do the postures, b/c I’m supposed to be working, but I’ll say the responses and the prayers. I always get something from the homiles.
 
I thought Archbishop Foley said good things about televised Mass, at the 2005 Synod:

“I would ask that bishops around the world take advantage of the opportunity to telecast the liturgy and to take great care about the manner in which such telecast liturgies are celebrated. …
Broadcast liturgies should be viewed as normative for what is to be expected in local celebrations of the Eucharist. The reverence of the celebrant and participants, the faithfulness to the liturgical law of the Church, the quality of the music and the participation of the faithful should be models of liturgical worship, inspiring for the faithful and edifying for those who do not share our faith but who may be watching or listening, even out of curiosity. While viewing a telecast liturgy does not satisfy one’s Sunday obligation, it can and ought to help to deepen one’s spiritual life. The telecasting of the liturgy is not merely a service for the sick and the elderly who cannot personally assist at Mass. Watching a telecast liturgy can be an appropriate preparation for personal assistance at Sunday liturgy or it can be a continued period of thanksgiving and reflection after the worshipper has returned home. …”

More of what he said is at vatican.va/news_services/press/sinodo/documents/bollettino_21_xi-ordinaria-2005/xx_plurilingue/b05_xx.html (search for “Foley”).
 
In October 2005, I had a very, very bad case of the flu. I couldn’t attend Mass that Sunday. Since my fever was breaking, I couldn’t really sleep very well and wound up turning on the TV. What I saw was a great consolation, as I was privileged to catch the live satellite feed of the Closing Mass for the Synod on the Eucharist, celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI.

I followed the Mass as best I could. Even my dachshunds (who were sleeping at my side) were very quiet. I listened to the homily (English translation) and really enjoyed the Mass. It was like being there (okay, so I had a stash of Tamiflu and some Mexican cold medicine - which is way stronger and better than what we have stateside). It wasn’t the meds, though. It was something else. Even though the Holy Father was a gilliion miles away, there was something special that was transmitted live via the airwaves.

Yeah, I would have loved to have gone to Mass that day. But, I was still very weak. However, it was a blessing to at least be able to watch a most beautiful Holy Sacrifice. For me, that set the standard of how our liturgies should be. I haven’t miss a single Papal Mass since Benedict became Pope. I wish I could tell you what JPII’s celebration of Mass was like, but, it’s now like a big blur. I am grateful for the TV telecasts of the Papal Masses.
 
There is such a thing as a “spiritual Communion”. It’s not as good as being there, but it’s still a great spiritual help. Televised Masses are an big aid to doing a “spiritual Communion”, which is why EWTN has that little spiritual Communion type prayer onscreen before their TV Masses air.

It’s also very cool to be able to see special events in faraway places, like the Mass for sending the documents in Archbishop Sheen’s sainthood cause to Rome. And seeing “the norms” in other places makes you think hard about how well your parish honors and worships God in His house.
 
I regularly watch EWTN’s Mass at 6 pm. I would love to be able to attend daily Mass but traffic and location preclude this. I know that I am watching a Mass from earlier in the day but I do recite the prayers and, as EWTN welcomes you to do, I make a spiritual communion.
 
We listen to them and it helps to connect our kids to the Catholic faith tradition as they hear the chants, the prayers and the homily in a respectful fashion.

Sometimes we need a Catholic environment as opposed to our parish where things are kinda watered down. As Catholic parents we need to ensure our kids have a good sense of the faith as it should be understood and practiced.

EWTN is such a blessing and gives us hope for the future. Seeing the Pope celebrate Mass is certainly an inspiration.

My little girl asked if that was all the Priests in the the world when she was watching them process today. It was cute, since she had never seen so many priests.
My girls prayed along with the litany of the saints, televised Mass is quite a blessing.

God Bless
Scylla
 
My grandmother could not attend Mass due to health reasons. While she would have Eucharist administered occasionally, she loved being able to ‘attend’ Mass daily on EWTN.
 
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