Understanding the Eucharist

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crimson_dragon

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I feel confusion on part of people’s love of the eucharist, adoration, etc. I fully understand the meaning and purpose behind the eucharist, don’t get me wrong, however I see many people talking about overwhelming emotion or love for it. For me, it’s just part of the routine, I take it in my hands, I eat, make the sign of the cross, kneel, do a small prayer, etc. However, many here and elsewhere speak of it having an emotional attachment as well. Am I missing something here? Maybe I’m just not that type of person, but i thought maybe you could help and try and expain your experiences or thoughts on this to help me understand it better. Sometimes I feel guilty not feeling like that, so I hope you guys could help me out a little bit, thanks.
 
crimson dragon:
I feel confusion on part of people’s love of the eucharist, adoration, etc.
For those whose faith in Christ’s real presence in the Eucharist is high, the love of the Eucharist reflects their love of Jesus.

Imagine, you get to be in the presence of our Lord, and not just that, He has made Himself, as food for our spiritual, mental, and physical strengthening.

Next time you’re at mass, and you’re receiving communion, pray “I love you Jesus!”
 
crimson dragon:
I feel confusion on part of people’s love of the eucharist, adoration, etc. I fully understand the meaning and purpose behind the eucharist, don’t get me wrong, however I see many people talking about overwhelming emotion or love for it. For me, it’s just part of the routine, I take it in my hands, I eat, make the sign of the cross, kneel, do a small prayer, etc. However, many here and elsewhere speak of it having an emotional attachment as well. Am I missing something here? Maybe I’m just not that type of person, but i thought maybe you could help and try and expain your experiences or thoughts on this to help me understand it better. Sometimes I feel guilty not feeling like that, so I hope you guys could help me out a little bit, thanks.
Do you believe it is Jesus? If so, how could you not feel sentimental over Him?
 
That is not a bread. It’s Jesus.

Body and blood, soul and divinity. That is the body that went through all the passion to be eaten by you.

Christopher is right. What would you feel if you meet Jesus? Well, there you have it. That is the Body of Jesus.

And don’t try to conjure up emotion like most pentacostal (as I call them, The Church of Holy Endorphin). Feelings are just chemistry in your brain. With the right drug, feelings can be manipulated.

Ask for grace from God to understand the subtle meaning of the Eucharist.

Read the story of the Saints like Padre Pio, St Paul of the Cross etc e All saints have a high devotion toward the Eucharist. Read “Imitating Christ” by Thamas A. Kempis

Here’s the online version. You might want to buy the actual book to read it at your leisure. (or you could always print it out)
 
My first thoughts for you would be to pray about it. Please correct me if I am wrong but I do not think you have fully grasped the concept that the Eucharist is truelly our Lord.
This could very well be that you are still growing in your faith, it sounds like it to me at least. It is not simply about being a part of the routine. It is the culmination of the mass.

I know it may be difficult to understand why people revere the Eucharist the way they do so I ask that you pray about it.
Ask the Lord to show you the truth and to open your eyes, help you to see what others see. To really experience Him what better way is there but to recieve Him.
 
I am just learning to appreciate the Eucharist in a deeper way through adoration. One of the first times I went I read John 6 and then looked up to bask in the glory of what IS. Jesus Christ, substantially present before me. I have had many wonderful moments with Him in adoration. I recommend every Catholic have a weekly Holy Hour, if not daily.

“I am the bread of life. He who comes to me will never go hungry, and he who believes in me will never be thirsty.”

My next post will be rather long and consists of some research that I did about adoration and vocations. There is not many hard numbers but many stories about its effectiveness. It makes sense. Fall before Him and let Him change you.
 
acfp2000.com/Sections/sec9.html
Stanley Joseph Ott, Bishop of Baton Rouge, Louisiana writes that he was given the inspiration to begin Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration over dinner with “Bishops Flynn of Lafayette. Jacobs of Alexandria, and Speyrer of Lake Charles.” In their dioceses priests were inviting Missionaries of the Blessed Sacrament to begin Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration in their parishes. Among the many blessings which encouraged Bishop Ott was that of vocations.

When his excellency, Bishop Ott, spoke to Mother Teresa of Calcutta, he asked her “how she got so many women to join her religious order”. She explained: "We were just like other religious congregations with few vocations. Then at our chapter in the 1970s we made a decision to have a holy hour in all our convents each evening. Many blessings resulted from this Holy Hour the Bishop witnessed, for Mother Teresa continued, “We began to see more clearly our mission to serve the poor in Christ’s name. We began to live a more fruitful family life among ourselves. We experienced double the number of vocations in our congregation. And we grew personally in our intimacy with the Lord present in the Eucharist.” The Bishop is “confident” that this will occur in his diocese too (“Bishop’s Notebook”, Stanley Joseph Ott, Bishop of Baton Rouge, The Catholic Commentator, August 5, 1992, p. 4).

At St. John Fisher Seminary in Stamford, Connecticut there is a Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration chapel. According to the rector, Rev. Stephen M. DiGiovanni, the reason for beginning Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration was to “encourage young men of the community to find a vocation to the priesthood.” The enrollment at the seminary rose 50 percent within the first year that the chapel was founded (“Worshipers find solace in perpetual chapel”, Robin Denaro, Connecticut Post, Saturday, January 6, 1998, C2).

Bishop John Magee of Cloyne in Eire, Ireland reports that vocations to the priesthood in his diocese have tripled since he started Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration.In 1990 there were 16 seminarians and by 1993 the number had risen to 45 (‘By Your Fruits", Dr. J. F. Boyle. The Link, January 1996).

Allentown Bishop Thomas Welsh lauded St. Joseph’s PEA program for its large number of adorers. Msgr. Anthony Wassel of St. Joseph’s Parish in Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania believes that a late vocation to the priesthood and a contemplative order of nuns are the result of Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration in his parish. He says, “the power is in the Eucharist” (“God’s Work!”: Perpetual Adoration, John Haut, Soul Magazine, January-February, 1998, p. 16).

Bishop Seamus Hegarty of Derry, Ireland says that when he was Bishop of Raphoe, there were 20 vocations in 1990, and 19 came from parishes that had Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration. He believes that PEA is the greatest contribution he made as Bishop (“By Your Fruits”, Dr. J. F. Boyle, The Link, January 1996).

goccn.org/diocese/depts/vocations/Adoration&Vocations.htm
This is just a good read …

ncregister.com/national/120703.htm
“Prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament had a significant part to play in my vocation and in my ministry,” Father Reilly said. “I think the prayers for vocations, especially perpetual adoration, is the greatest thing we can do.”

archatl.com/offices/vocations/other.html
The presence of adoration in this archdiocese has been credited for the tremendous growth of religious vocations here.

ewtn.com/library/PRIESTS/ARLINGTN.TXT
Local priests offer a variety of answers. Some say it is unwavering allegiance to the Holy Father and Church teaching on the part of Arlington clergy and laity. Others p(name removed by moderator)oint parish-level efforts, such as perpetual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament.

catholic.net/RCC/Periodicals/Faith/9%2010%2098/THE%20SACRAMENTS.html
Commenting on the place of his parish’s Perpetual Adoration Chapel in the faith community, Fr. Fanelli said "Sometimes its presence is like good weather. You don’t appreciate how much good it does until much later. I know our chapel has encouraged some vocations within our parish, but I’m sure it has contributed to many outside our boundaries as well.

cuf.org/june99a.htm
An article in the Catholic World Report (May 1995) by Michael Flach analyzes the remarkable increase in vocations to the priesthood in the Arlington, Virginia diocese. Fr. James Gould, diocesan vocation director, explains the reasons for their success: unswerving allegiance to the Pope and magisterial teaching; perpetual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament in parishes, with an emphasis on praying for vocations; and the strong effort by a significant number of diocesan priests who extend themselves to help young men and women remain open to the Lord’s will in their lives.
 
stlouisreview.com/archive/archive.php?page=990108_02.htm
In an effort to increase vocations, the archdiocese has sought to increase participation in eucharistic adoration and prayer for vocations, Father Butler said. The recent increase in vocations at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary can be attributed at least in part to these and similar activities, the priest said.

diocese-of-sioux-falls.org/communication/bulletin/2004/may/bishop.html
We know from examples around the world that devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, either through 24-hour adoration or special Eucharistic days, not only leads to an increase in vocations, but to a generosity found in the hearts of the people which expresses itself in service to those most in need.

catholicculture.org/docs/doc_view.cfm?recnum=2953
Msgr. Joseph Ramirez of the Philippines, who has done so much to spread the devotion of perpetual adoration in his country and throughout the world, has written some moving letters in defense of Holy Hours, encouraging pastors to open perpetual adoration chapels. Since his crusade began, the Philippines have hundreds of adoration chapels, and the whole country has been blessed with an increase in vocations and a strongly Catholic faithful.

therealpresence.org/eucharst/pea/whyadore.htm
One pastor told me that since his parish began perpetual Eucharistic adoration, his Sunday and weekday Mass attendance has doubled and the Sunday collection has tripled!

stthomasmore.org/history.asp
Father Walsh also added the Holy Hour and the Perpetual Adoration in the Oratory of the Blessed Sacrament … There has been an increase in vocations to the religious life and missionary work.

miamiarch.org/news/archive/column2002/columnxx2002detail.cfm?abc_id=33 (Dead link, cached on Google)
I believe the increase in vocations in South Florida also is due to the work of our parish vocations committees (PVCs). These are lay people whose role is to pray for and identify vocations in their parish communities. … These vocations committees are active in many parishes. In other churches, people take turns at daily adoration of the Blessed Sacrament in order to beseech the Lord to “send more workers into the vineyard.”
 
crimson dragon:
I feel confusion on part of people’s love of the eucharist, adoration, etc. I fully understand the meaning and purpose behind the eucharist, don’t get me wrong, however I see many people talking about overwhelming emotion or love for it. For me, it’s just part of the routine, I take it in my hands, I eat, make the sign of the cross, kneel, do a small prayer, etc. However, many here and elsewhere speak of it having an emotional attachment as well. Am I missing something here? Maybe I’m just not that type of person, but i thought maybe you could help and try and expain your experiences or thoughts on this to help me understand it better. Sometimes I feel guilty not feeling like that, so I hope you guys could help me out a little bit, thanks.
Well, because when you receive you are being joined to Christ and He is closer to you than you are to yourself.

He binds himself to you and this is eternal life, Jesus puts the sanctifying grace in and it sustains you in it. You are being divinized, which is partaking in the divine nature of God, you communion with God, sharing in His divine life. That is what sanctifying grace is, and with out we can not be saved.

What you have to keep in mind is what we do experince is not found in the senses, so do not worry about what you feel, rely on what you know.
 
_Christopher_:
Do you believe it is Jesus? If so, how could you not feel sentimental over Him?
Easy, because we do not experience him in the senses, we must see Him with the eyes of faith. If you don’t “feel” Him but believe in Him that is fine.
 
crimson dragon:
I feel confusion on part of people’s love of the eucharist, adoration, etc. I fully understand the meaning and purpose behind the eucharist, don’t get me wrong, however I see many people talking about overwhelming emotion or love for it. For me, it’s just part of the routine, I take it in my hands, I eat, make the sign of the cross, kneel, do a small prayer, etc. However, many here and elsewhere speak of it having an emotional attachment as well. Am I missing something here? Maybe I’m just not that type of person, but i thought maybe you could help and try and expain your experiences or thoughts on this to help me understand it better. Sometimes I feel guilty not feeling like that, so I hope you guys could help me out a little bit, thanks.
I can understand why many Catholics here would speak so emotionally about the Eucharist. It is after all, Christ Himself, who has come down to us from Heaven at Mass and resides in our churches under the appearance of bread and wine. All this done for the love of us.

I don’t think you’re missing anything. Faith is not merely based on emotions and there are times in our lives where we pray or go to Mass and don’t “feel” an overwhelming sense of emotion. Just keep on praying and try gaining a greater awareness of Him who is truly there at Mass. You might want to try, if possible, attending daily Mass or Eucharistic Adoration—going in to a Catholic Church and just worship and pray to God who is truly present within the tabernacle.

You also said that you do this mostly about of routine; maybe try getting out of that mindset and spend a little time before Mass meditating about Jesus, who you are about to receive in Holy Communion. These things might help; and if you still don’t “feel” anything, don’t worry about it and just receive Christ in Holy Communion and have faith that He is truly there.

Miguel.

P.S Another way, which has helped me a lot to grow in reverence and awareness towards the Eucharist, is to take Communion on the tongue. You might want to try that as well. 🙂
 
Exactly as I thought! Thanks for the help. I believe the problem lies in the fact that Catholic language still uses many archaic terms, and often these terms contain, in the modern sense, exagurations of emotions to get across a point. This has always been kind of a turn-off for me, and I cant help but wonder if it keeps many potential Catholics from joining simply because we seem “out of touch” or “pentacostal”. Language changes over time, even the way we speak has changed rapidly in just a little time. I guess im a very straight-to-the-point person when it comes to my religon and faith, so i try and avoid speaking in poetic terms and phrases. This is also why I don’t pray the rosary or use any pre-writen prayers, I feel it’s just not my style or my own words, and that if I pray to God, I just tell him directly whatever is on my mind.
 
crimson dragon:
Exactly as I thought! Thanks for the help. I believe the problem lies in the fact that Catholic language still uses many archaic terms, and often these terms contain, in the modern sense, exagurations of emotions to get across a point. This has always been kind of a turn-off for me, and I cant help but wonder if it keeps many potential Catholics from joining simply because we seem “out of touch” or “pentacostal”. Language changes over time, even the way we speak has changed rapidly in just a little time. I guess im a very straight-to-the-point person when it comes to my religon and faith, so i try and avoid speaking in poetic terms and phrases. This is also why I don’t pray the rosary or use any pre-writen prayers, I feel it’s just not my style or my own words, and that if I pray to God, I just tell him directly whatever is on my mind.
Well you don’t ‘have’ to adopt the Catholic style of spirituality but if you can understand it better you can see it actually helps you get closer to God, not stand in the way of that but I suspect you are a new Catholic or a Catholic who is only now taking their faith seriously. In any event I think time spent reading the lives of the saints and going to adoration will help you out immensely.
 
Crimson,

First do not despair. Pray silently and frequently and find a church which offers Eucharist devotion; spend some time you cannot afford to give up in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament and you will with time come to sense the true presence of Christ. Recall that those men who knew Him best when He was on earth did not recognize Him when He appeared to them after the resurrection. They saw Him only after He revealed Himself.
 
Let me recommend a book, The Blessed Eucharist by Fr. Michael Müller. You can get it from TAN. It is written in flowery 19th-century style language, but it has many worthwhile insights.

Scott
 
I’m not a recent convert, I’m a cradle life-long catholic. I simply wanted to point out that many forms of worship seem too “out of touch” for me, I’m really the type of guy who thinks and prays things over as he’s walking along rather than spend time using the rosary or eucharistic adoration.
 
That’s cool. Whatever gets you closer to our Lord Jesus Christ, stick with it 👍.

I do recommend the Rosary, even if you might find it repetitive and something that doesn’t suit your taste. You can even say it while walking or doing an activity.

I’m the type of person who just won’t sit still and I find prayer hard and “dry” at times (ESPCIALLY the Rosary) but praying the rosary, is, for me, something that has helped me in my relationship with God and His Mother. I think other Catholics in here can testify to it as well.

So try praying the Rosary; it doesn’t have to be everyday and it doesn’t even have to be five decades. You can start by saying it once a week or one decade (10 Hail Mary’s a Mystery) or whatever. You’ll find that it works wonders.

But, in any case, whatever works for your relationship with Christ, stick to it.

Miguel.
 
Besides the Eucharist being Jesus physically present to us, it is also a sacrament, and it conveys all the grace that our Lord wishes to bestow upon us at that moment. Saying “Amen” to the Eucharist is saying “Yes” to Jesus and all that He is. It is better than a warm handshake from a friend or a hug from your spouse. When you say “Amen” and receive Him within you… into your heart, your mind, your body, and your life, you are saying “Yes” to the promise of His Love, His Joy, His Peace, and His Promise to be with us forever and… for us to be with Him forever. That gives me the warm fuzzies or whatever you want to call it. As for Adoration, think of a time when someone very busy, but very special to you, took time from their day to help you do something. You knew it was a sacrifice for them and that they had better things to do. But, it made you feel good. It made you feel special and it made you feel like you were worth something. Think what it does for Jesus, our Lord, when you take an hour out of your day to spend with Him. He, who we call God, is so alone… give Him some of you (your time) and I can only tell you that you will be rewarded 100 fold. If we want to have an intimate relationship with Christ, the only way to be intimate with someone is to “be” with them. To spend time, to share thoughts and fears and dreams, to find answers to questions, to share the deepest part of your being… to build trust, to grow in love, to be everything for each other. I think that is what He asks of us and I believe that we can only do that by saying “Yes” to Him as often as possible and by spending time with Him as we give ourselves to Him. God Bless You!
 
crimson dragon:
I feel confusion on part of people’s love of the eucharist, adoration, etc. I fully understand the meaning and purpose behind the eucharist, don’t get me wrong, however I see many people talking about overwhelming emotion or love for it. For me, it’s just part of the routine, I take it in my hands, I eat, make the sign of the cross, kneel, do a small prayer, etc. However, many here and elsewhere speak of it having an emotional attachment as well. Am I missing something here? Maybe I’m just not that type of person, but i thought maybe you could help and try and expain your experiences or thoughts on this to help me understand it better. Sometimes I feel guilty not feeling like that, so I hope you guys could help me out a little bit, thanks.
I was fortunate enough to visit Orvieto Italy last October. There is a corporal cloth there stained with blood from a Eucharist. These miracles seem to happen with priests that are having trouble with the eucharist. You could read up on these miracles and maybe find some inspiration there.

http://www.signumcrucis.net/images/Italy/eb.jpg

You can read about my trip to Italy and specifically Orvieto at signumcrucis.net/pilgrimage.htm

-Ted
 
crimson dragon:
I’m not a recent convert, I’m a cradle life-long catholic. I simply wanted to point out that many forms of worship seem too “out of touch” for me, I’m really the type of guy who thinks and prays things over as he’s walking along rather than spend time using the rosary or eucharistic adoration.
Hi Crimson,
I, too,feel like you. We seem to have many words in our Faith today that have become antiquated and may be putting people off joining our Faith.
I think what you are trying to explain is that you dont feel “charismatic” when it comes to the Eucharist. I am in Australia, and I am not sure if you have that term over there, but here at my Parish we have a Charismatic Prayer Group. I am not a member, as it is not for me, but I know some people in it, and they seem to portray all those attributes that we may think only “Pentecostals” possess.
They close their eyes and hold their hands to their hearts as they sing, and they exclaim “Amen” a lot.
I believe prayer isnt just reciting word for word the Rosary of the Our Father, although I do think it is important to pray these.
I believe prayer is a conversation with God, Jesus, Mary, and all the Saints.
It is a conversation telling them our needs, weaknesses, and asking for their help.
Yes, you believe and understand the Eucharist is Jesus. So do I.
You just dont openly share your emotions about it with the rest of the congregation, or realise the love you have for the Eucharist in your heart, but it is there.
Love Kellie
 
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