Why Does It seem Like Mardi Gras is a bigger celebration than Easter?

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valient_Lucy

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It bothers me a little bit, that there are all these cultural ways to celebrate Mardi Gras/Carnival, but then Easter can come and go without even realizing it. It bugs me that we don’t seem to have as many customs or traditions related to the celebration of Easter, as we do with Carnival or Christmas.

Easter bothers me sometimes because I feel very joyful during Easter, but there doesn’t feel like much of an outlet for that joy. I would love to pull out all the stops for Easter, but have no idea how to do it.

Granted, this post is a little ahead of its time, but it makes me sad that another Easter will come and go without a good party, if that makes any sense.
 
It bothers me a little bit, that there are all these cultural ways to celebrate Mardi Gras/Carnival, but then Easter can come and go without even realizing it. It bugs me that we don’t seem to have as many customs or traditions related to the celebration of Easter, as we do with Carnival or Christmas.

Easter bothers me sometimes because I feel very joyful during Easter, but there doesn’t feel like much of an outlet for that joy. I would love to pull out all the stops for Easter, but have no idea how to do it.

Granted, this post is a little ahead of its time, but it makes me sad that another Easter will come and go without a good party, if that makes any sense.
Maybe it is the area of the country you are in. Here, if you mention Mardi Gras, folks would think you are talking only about New Orleans.
 
What gets me, is that the mardi gras decadence as we currently know it, makes no sense if one does not observe Lent and Easter right after. I can maybe see if you are ‘giving up’ alcohol or eating fried food, or whatever to ‘blow it out’ within reason to prepare for the fasting that comes with Lent. Now, you have all these carnival people (Carne vale ‘fairwell to the flesh’) who are all about the immoral sex sex sex, and for what reason? Not to give it up for lent and then resume the immorality right after…just another excuse for a party…

Around here in La, Easter is a big deal…the out of towners from nothing-fun-to-do towns around the US are what make Mardi Gras in La especially in N.O. the spectacle that it is. You can now go anytime of the year to New Orleans and bring flashy beads and see girls go crazy. It’s not just during Mardi Gras.
 
It bothers me a little bit, that there are all these cultural ways to celebrate Mardi Gras/Carnival, but then Easter can come and go without even realizing it.
It bothers me too, but that’s the secular world we live in. 😦

As far as making it more of a celebration, maybe you can have a nice dinner with extended family or something – that’s what we do. 🙂
 
It bothers me a little bit, that there are all these cultural ways to celebrate Mardi Gras/Carnival, but then Easter can come and go without even realizing it. It bugs me that we don’t seem to have as many customs or traditions related to the celebration of Easter, as we do with Carnival or Christmas.

Easter bothers me sometimes because I feel very joyful during Easter, but there doesn’t feel like much of an outlet for that joy. I would love to pull out all the stops for Easter, but have no idea how to do it.

Granted, this post is a little ahead of its time, but it makes me sad that another Easter will come and go without a good party, if that makes any sense.
Why are you not doing something? Do you mean that your parish has little to participate in or that you don’t know anything to do as a family? I have not been Catholic for many years, but I’ve seen lots of traditions to participate in for Lent and then Easter.

Our parish tones down the music and everything for Lent and we have a week-long mission during Lent to help the entire parish prepare themselves for Easter. No other parish activities are allowed to conflict with the mission and it is usually packed every night.

We have Stations of the Cross every Friday of Lent followed by our parish fish fry where the teens serve to help raise money for their annual mission trip to Mexico. Different adult ministries help them each week by running the kitchen and setting up the dining room. We have major stuff for Holy Week from Thursday through Sunday. Some people choose to sit the traditional vigil through the night during this time. We have a passion play that has been completely acted by our high school students for the past several years. They used to do living Stations of the Cross.

Easter is WOW beginning with an amazing vigil mass!! The large fire is lit and the people being received into the church light their candles from it and then process in with their candles and sponsors to symbolize the light of Christ entering the church. Mass begins in candlelight and the music is the most beautiful of the entire year, including Christmas. Watching the adults being baptized and confirmed is inspiring every year. Even though mass takes many hours, it is always packed. We have parishioners from all over the world who deck themselves in traditional festive garments from their homelands for Easter which is very beautiful and affirming of what a universal church we have.

Our teen mass moves from 4:30pm Sunday to sunrise on Sunday. We have trumpets, etc to play triumphant music at all the masses. All of the people belt out the Gloria with gusto. I sang every mass from Thursday through Sunday, so I know that each was different but equally great.

Before our permanent church building was completed, the sunrise mass was outdoors with the people facing East so that the sun would rise just about the time of the consecration. Amazing!! People would show up at 3:30am to set up outdoors. The parishioners would bring their own chairs and blankets and arrive 60-90 minutes early to get a place while shivering in the cold. After mass everyone would go inside the hall for hot drinks and doughnuts to visit before heading home for breakfast.

I hope that if your parish does not have much planned that you will step up and volunteer to get something going. It only takes one person to gather a few friends and get something planned. Our parish started that way with each activity and then they just grow from year to year.
 
We always made a big deal of Easter in my family.

Starts with a nice spread of coffee, cakes and deli items for breakfast. Followed by an egg-cracking contest (each person chooses one of the pre-prepared dyed and decorated hard-boiled eggs, you crack your egg against another person’s, whosever egg is smashed loses the ‘round’, and you go on until there’s a final winner).

Followed by morning Mass, and a sumptuous spread for lunch that’s every bit as good as what we have at Christmas. Usually a spit roast with all the trimmings.

Mardi Gras/Shrove Tuesday/Carnevale isn’t even really a blip on our radar in comparison. If we remember, it might mean pancakes for breakfast, often enough we don’t remember, it being a work/school day.

Why can’t you make the choice to make Easter a big occasion? Have a chocolate egg hunt, give each other small gifts if you like (the tradition used to be a new set of clothes). Parade around the neighbourhood with actors dressed as the Risen Jesus and Mary and saying ‘Christ is Risen’ … find something to do if you feel the urge!
 
I like the idea of giving each other new clothes, and the coffee.

What else do people do to celebrate Easter? Does anyone have any special traditions?
 
Where I live, Mardi Gras was something a few people knew they did in Louisiana, but not everyone even knows where Louisiana is over here. Easter is usually a major holiday, one of the five maybe that a lotof folks acknowledge at all. The parks have public egg hunts for the little kids and people get together with friends to celebrate at home. It’s not really an outdoor thing for adults because it’s so wet most years.
This year someone is having a public Mardi Gras celebration here – and guess when it is. It’s on the following Friday.
 
Where I live, Mardi Gras was something a few people knew they did in Louisiana, but not everyone even knows where Louisiana is over here. Easter is usually a major holiday, one of the five maybe that a lotof folks acknowledge at all. The parks have public egg hunts for the little kids and people get together with friends to celebrate at home. It’s not really an outdoor thing for adults because it’s so wet most years.
This year someone is having a public Mardi Gras celebration here – and guess when it is. It’s on the following Friday.
Nice. Mardi Gras during Lent. :rolleyes:
 
It bothers me a little bit, that there are all these cultural ways to celebrate Mardi Gras/Carnival, but then Easter can come and go without even realizing it. It bugs me that we don’t seem to have as many customs or traditions related to the celebration of Easter, as we do with Carnival or Christmas.

Easter bothers me sometimes because I feel very joyful during Easter, but there doesn’t feel like much of an outlet for that joy. I would love to pull out all the stops for Easter, but have no idea how to do it. .
that is probably a cultural thing and depends where you live. here mardi gras is not big, cuaresma is big, so is Semana Santa, and Pascua, and the traditions, manner of living, and family culture, down to what is offered in bakeries and local restaurants reflect it.

if you really want to have Easter joy that continues after Easter, participate in your parish RCIA program in any capacity, and by all means the Easter Vigil, now there is some joy that will have you dancing in the streets.
 
Mardi Gras is not during Lent. It ends abruptly at midnight tonight. There is no celebrating after midnight. Second, what you see in the French Quarter is not native New Orleanians. It is out-of-town folk who believe that that is what we native New Orelanians do. Nothing could be further from the truth. Most native New Orleanians avoid the French Quarter like the plague.

It is a big celebration because it is part and parcel of our French heritage. But equally a part of French heritage (which doesn’t get much airtime) is our Catholicism and the Catholicism of my Spanish, African, Islenos, Cajun, Irish, Scot, English, German, Italian, Sicilian, Croat and most recently Vietnamese brothers and sisters.

The churches will be full tomorrow for Ash Wednesday and many, like me, don’t even attend Mardi Gras. But I would not reject Mardi Gras because it is a deeply ingrained part of our culture no matter how the tourists celebrate. Many, many Catholics here make it a point to attend Mass on Fridays during Lent.

For the Triduum, attendance at Holy Thursday is marginal but attendance at the Good Friday Liturgy and the Stations of the Cross at my cathedral parish are well attended if not packed. The Great Vigil on Holy Saturday is standing room only as is the Mass on Easter Day.

There is an Easter Parade in New Orleans but Easter is a very, very family oriented day. Families all over New Orleans and all over south Louisiana gather to eat and to let the kids go on Easter egg hunts, etc. etc.

It really disturbs me that the culture in which I grew up - a very, very, Catholic culture, has been reduced to Mardi Gras gone Wild. That is a grossly inaccurate version of not only New Orleans but all of Catholic South Louisiana where Mardi Gras is celebrated.
 
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