Hostage to the Devil

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Joey_Storer

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I noticed another thread on attacks by the Devil. I have recenlty read Malachi Martin’s book, Hostage to the Devil. I found that while exorcism is very frightening perhaps more frightening is the subtle and subversive way that people in this book came to become posessed.

My questions for the forum are:

Where does the Catholic Church stand these days on posession? One view I have found in my parish is, “Those things don’t happen in the church any more…”

How many dioscese in the US have designated exorcists?

Do you know how many “black masses” are being held in major US cities every day?

Joey
 
Malachi Martin was a schismatic. Though never, as far as I know, formally excommunicated, he regarded the Novus Ordo Missae as an abomination to God, and invalid when said in English (i.e. the words “for you and for all” were said to invalidate the consecration).

He also denied that the Pope validly consecrated Russia to Mary.

Stay away from his writings.
 
On a recent Foxnews story it said that each diocese has an exorcist. Makes sense to me, the Devil is working his slime in this world.
 
I read his Windswept House, and am a worse person because of it!

Martin was a schismatic who subscribed to the “Campos Profession of Faith,” which rejected the Church’s Missa Normativa.

His book (Hostage) suffers from many flaws, not the least of which is the fact that none of his supposed “exorcisms” can be documented as to actually have happened. This is because he keeps the names anonymous.

Granted, this anonymity would be understandable even if he were legit, but consicering the source (an avowed schismatic), I wouldn’t trust it.

A good critique of this guy can be found in Michael Cuneo’s American Exorcism: Expelling Demons in the Land of Plenty.
 
Joey,

Having read Hostage to the Devil many years ago, I can say it made me want to sleep witht the lights on for a few nights.

Yes, there are still Exorcists in the dioceses of the USA. A priest who was once an assistant pastor at my parish and from whom I received a very considerable blessing and spiritual healing, unbeknownst to him, was later appointed as the Excorcist in the Archdioces in which I live. He was also very involved in the healing ministry after he left our parrish, when he was asked to officiate at healing services and masses. This before he was named to the post of Exorcist. He is now in very poor health and I solict your prayers for him.

Emmaus
 
I read Hostage to the Devil and found it boring compared to “Posessed” the true story the movie the excorsist was based on. I think some of his stories in hostage to the devil seemed stretched. The strange thing about the book posessed was instead of being scared I was inspired by the courage of the jesuit preists. I thought it was a heroic story.
 
Joey Storer:
I noticed another thread on attacks by the Devil. I have recenlty read Malachi Martin’s book, Hostage to the Devil. I found that while exorcism is very frightening perhaps more frightening is the subtle and subversive way that people in this book came to become posessed.

My questions for the forum are:

Where does the Catholic Church stand these days on posession? One view I have found in my parish is, “Those things don’t happen in the church any more…”

How many dioscese in the US have designated exorcists?

Do you know how many “black masses” are being held in major US cities every day?

Joey
catholicism.org/pages/aubrey.htm
 
I don’t know how many “black masses” are said in a day, but they are real and more prevalent than we think. Fr. Corapi, who had quite a lifestyle (drugs, money, promiscuity) before his conversion, has also talked about satanic priests calling down curses upon people and objects (such as drugs). These things are real and we need to continue to be prayer warriors against these types of evil.
 
I read Hostage to the Devil, and I’ve also read Farther Amorth’s two books. I don’t find anything in Hostage to the Devil that is not consistent with what Father Amorth tells us.

I was also very saddened and disturbed by Winswept House. However, from what I can see going on in the Church in America, much that is in the book seems possible.

As for Fr. Martin, I am still not sure what his status was. A website states he was released from his vows of poverty and obedience but not chastity, and that he was to report directly to Rome. And there were also allegations of sexual misconduct against him, but they were made publicly after he died, and he can’t answer them. It is also true that he had a lot of enemies in the Church, who might try to spread false rumors. So, since it’s probably not possible to know his full story, I guess we have to see if what he wrote is compatible or incompatible with other evidence, since we can’t take everything he said or wrote at face value alone.
 
Joey, I myself just read the same book last month. Even though Fr. Martin’s reasons for his special dispensation are not known to the public I do believe he was a man of God and that the experiences of his life as an exorcist took their toll on him. Rmember, that he did aways believe in the One true Church and he never did walk completely away from it. God Bless you and may God have mercy on us. J.R.

P.S. I say alot more prayers to St. Michael. Check the history on that prayer it also might scare you.
 
Father Martin’s website can be found here, and there are a number of disturbing elements in it to show that he did not die a Catholic, but a “traditionalist” dissenter; i.e. a schismatic.

First, check out his Profession of Faith. Its none other than the “Campos Profession,” which rejects the livity (although not the validity) of the Missa Normativa.

[The group that once signed this profession is now reconciled to Rome, and is known as the “Sacerdotal Society of St. John Mary Baptist Vianney”.]

In his [URL='http://starharbor.com/fr_martin/ques.html']FAQs
he makes it clear that he sympathizes with Lefebvrists and Sedevacansists. He claims that both their Masses are lciit, and the Lefebvrists aren’t really excommunicated.

Yeah, there may be some truth to some of the things that he writes, even the apparently wacky ones. But I’ll wait for a real Catholic to write and document them before I take them seriously.
 
Exorcisms and the reality of the demonic are real. The major authority worldwide on the subject is a priest appointed by Pope John Paul II by the name of Father Gabriel Amorth. He is the Chief exorcist of Rome, and has written great book (recent ones) on exorcisms. There is SUPPOSED to be an exorcist in EACH diocese, and sometimes he has assiatants (other priests).
Great question on a topic which sad to say has been greatly brushed aside in our days.
 
I’ve ben told, by some very trustworthy priests who I think might have some “inside” information, that each diocese is supposed to have at least two. However, the identity of these exorcists is kept secret.

As to why the secrecy, I’ve been told two reasons. The “conspiritorial” one is that they could be targets for murder by Satanists. The other, more plausible, is to avoid possible gossip and scandal. Imagine if you knw that Father X was an exorcist, and you saw him enter another person’s house. It may just be a friendly visit, or regular spiritual coundel, but you might assume that the person he is counseling is posessed!
 
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DominvsVobiscvm:
Malachi Martin was a schismatic.
That is slander. One might warn others to stay away from Martin’s writings for other reasons, but Malachi Martin was certainly no schismatic.
 
One might warn others to stay away from Martin’s writings for other reasons, but Malachi Martin was certainly no schismatic.
Oh, what was I thinking? Of course adhering to a schismatic profession of faith doesn’t make you schismatic!

👍
 
It is sad to see that many people who out of their baseless opinions malign the memory of Father Malachi Martin, and have slandered him for years: nothing other than the devil’s influence. He was not only advisor to three popes, more recently Pope Paul VI, but a true scholar on not only Vatican affairs, but Fatima, and prophesy. I sugest to those who say he was kicked out of the Jesuits etc, to see the RECENT statement by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) themselves, saying the contrary. He was dispensed (at his request) from the Jesuits by Pope Paul VI, and freed from his vow of poverty. However, he continued with permission of the Pope to function as a priest, under a particular Bishop, but always responding DIRECTLY to Rome.
 
I never said Martin was “kicked out” by the Jesuits. So far as I know, he left on good terms, as this was recently confirmed by the Society.

It was after his leave that he went into schism. Who knows? Maybe, with all his dealings with the devil, he somehow came under diabolical influence, and went into schism without realizing it (although he should have).

I think something similar happened to former Cardinal Archbishop Milingo. He was a very popular, if controversial, exorcist in Africa. Later, much to everyone’s shock, he joined the Unification Church (i.e. the cult known as the “Moonies”) and married a Korean dentist in a mass-wedding!

He later visited the Vatican, made a retreat, and reconciled himself to the Holy Father. He then wrote a book about his experiences, saying he had come under diabolical influence, what with all his contact with evil spirits in his exorcisms, and it compelled him to join with the Moonie cult.

Unfortuantely, Cardinal Milingo’s story, so far as I know, did not have a happy ending. Last I heard, he’s rejoined the Moonies.

😦
 
If you have access to Scott Peck’s book People of the Lie, you might find Chapter 5 quite interesting. Peck (author of The Road Less Traveled) is a psychiatrist called in to witness two Catholic exorcisms. Skeptical at first, he later was won over to the idea that people really can be possessed by demons.

A chilling read.
 
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DominvsVobiscvm:
Oh, what was I thinking? Of course adhering to a schismatic profession of faith doesn’t make you schismatic!

👍
A profession of faith isn’t schismatic; people are schismatic. There is nothing “schismatic” about the Campos Profession of Faith, in fact it professes communion with the Holy See, the exact opposite of schism.
Another issue that has generated a measure of criticism against RCF has been the endorsement of RCF’s activities by Fr. Malachi Martin, †R.I.P.† Critics have often cited rumors, innuendo, and gossip to justify their complaints. (Is it possible that Fr. Martin may have committed some wrongdoing 40 years in the past? Of course it is possible. Does any one of us have nothing in our past that caused us subsequent remorse and contrition?) However, when I contacted Fr. Hardon to solicit his opinion and advice about Fr. Martin’s endorsement of RCF, Fr. Hardon explicitly stated that Fr. Martin was “right with the Church.” In the years that I was privileged to deal with Fr. Martin, everything that he said to me, and every public statement that he made which I read was completely in line with Church teaching. I will, therefore, not apologize for displaying Fr. Martin’s endorsement. I am honored to do so. To those critics who cannot accept my decision, the best we can hope for is to agree to disagree. [my emphasis]
Ref: freerepublic.com/focus/religion/710489/posts
 
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