Great Catholic Books

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Theology for beginners by F.J. Sheed (sold through CA at least that is where I got my copy).

And for lighter uplifting reading Mother Teresa Essential Writings intro by Jean Maalouf from Orbis books

This one is a good one to have out when our seperated Christian Brothers and sisters come over, as she touched so many of them and by allowing them to see some of her love for the Church it frees them to ask more questions.😉
 
I love threads like this, and yet they are so frustrating! I want to go out and get all of these books, but my shelves are already sagging; our latest move included over 50 boxes of books, and my back can’t take too many more!

However, I couldn’t resist picking up Robert Wilken’s recent book, The Spirit of Early Christian Thought: Seeking the Face of God . Its a particularly enjoyable book, a combination of cultural and intellectual history of the early Christian period and looking at how they addressed some key questions–the Bible, liturgy, the Trinity, the Genesis account of the creation of the earth, and a host of others. Great stuff, straight from the key Fathers of the Church. And, no mincing words–they were intensely aware of the Real Presence!

Sam
 
I’m currently reading “Truth and Sanity” by Frank Sheed. Very good discussion of the Holy Trinity.

But I am interested in knowing whether this is a good book for Catholics to study Church tradition…

Jaroslav Pelikan: “The Emergence of the Catholic Tradition (The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Vol. 1)”.

Good theology and doctrine (recommended)?

Bad theology and doctrine (not recommended)?
 
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Brian:
As an addendum, I am particularly interested in anyone who can recommend good Catholic fiction or poetry, specifically by an English speaking author, from any period.
Christopher Stasheff is Catholic Science fiction and fanstasy writer. It’s not Tolkein but is fun to read. He started writing because he though it was weird that medeival style fantasy didn’t have a religious bent to it since medieval people were very Catholic.
His book Her Majesty’s Wizard has one of the best descriptions of Confession that I’ve ever seen. The protaganist is a 20th century lapsed Catholic who accidentally falls into a universe where magic exists and the Reformation never happened.

His Warlock series is about Rod Gallowglass, a spacefarer (and lapsed Catholic) who lands on a planet that was originally colonized by the Society for Creative Anachronism. Telepathic and telekinetic people are seen as magical.
In both series we see the protaganists find their way back to the Church.
 
Saw somebody mention “Triumph” by Crocker. I loved this book and gave it to my friend who is a school teacher hoping to turn his faith switch on. He claims he read it and it was O.K., but the handed me “The Davinci Code” and told me that that book really opened his eyes about the Catholic Church. Imagine that!!! An english teacher that discounts history, but gives FICTION a nod as if it were the inspired word of truth!!

Things like this are so frustrating to me!!!

Chad
 
Vanessa,

peace be with you! wasn’t that section on the saints and Mary just horrible???!! i was actually offended by it. i was reading for a friend so they would know whether they could recommend it to others and it was for the most part good until that. it was really bad.

i have been reading from several books all at once (something i don’t like doing but often find myself doing!) Three Philosophies of Life by Peter Kreeft, Man and Woman by Dietrich Von Hildebrand, If you Really Loved Me by Jason Evert, Heart of Joy (quotes from Mother Teresa) and I just ordered Scott Hahn’s new book Swear to God…can’t wait to read it! 👍

in Jesus and Mary,
dominic savio
 
A few more recommendations.

“On Being Catholic” Thomas Howard ( a convert) great apologetics.

“The Evidential Power of Beauty, Science & Theology Meet”
Thomas Dubay, S.M.
A book that is really thought provoking. Should be required reading for those who think creation is a giant accident with no meaning beyond tonight’s TV “reality shows”

“Learning The Virtues That Lead You to God.”
Romano Guardini. Learn how to Grow in Virtue, by a man who
never wrote a bad book, in my humble estimation.

“Spiritual Secrets of a Trappist Monk”
Father M Raymond O.C.S.O. Read this slowly, pray about it.Difficult in parts but really worth the effort if you are in to
deepening your Spiritual life.

V60.🙂
 
I just finished Malachi Martin’s “Hostage to the Devil”. That is one book that will increase your faith. Martin who is deceased now was a Jesuit and the book is about 5 excorcisms. For those who believe in God it is important to remember that their is evil in the world (the devil) and it wants to do everything it can to lead us away from God.
 
“The Personal Memoirs of Joan of Arc”, by Mark Twain.

An early historical novel and a real joy to read. But there is one glaring question that begs to be asked and if anyone has read the book, please let me know, I’d love to discuss it with you.

Bil
 
Adam N:
I just started on “Christ is passing by” by St. Josemaria Escriva. It’s supposed to be good-- a collection of his homilies. I haven’t gotten into it enough yet to comment personally, though.
This is EXCELLENT! Any of his works are. You might read other books by him: The Way and The Forge.
 
  1. “If Your Mind Wanders At Mass” Thomas Howard
  2. “The Lamb’s Supper” Scott Hahn
  3. “Theology For Beginners” Frank Sheed
  4. “Apologetics and Catholic Doctrine” Archbishop Sheehan edited by Fr Peter Joseph
  5. the “Prove It” series by Amy Welborn - great books for teenagers or undercatechised adults
  6. “Catholicism for Dummies” Fr John Trigilio and Fr Ken Brighenti
    7.“My Meditation On the Gospel” Fr James E Sullivan
  7. “Where We Got the Bible” Henry Graham
  8. “To Know Christ Jesus” Frank Sheed
  9. All 7 volumes of “In Conversation With God” by Fr Francis Fernandez
I am trying to finish “Introduction to the Devout Life” by St Francis de Sales but am finding it heavy going.
 
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wet-rat:
I am just starting to read *The Acting Person * by Cardinal Karol Wojtyla. It was written in the 70’s before he became JPII.

It’s volume X of Analecta Husserliana: The Yearbook of Phenomenological Research.

It’s not the easiest of reads, so it will probably take a while. Remind me later and I might have some comments.
I’ve heard that there are some problems with the English translation of The Acting Person. Any information on this Wet-Rat?
 
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Brian:
As an addendum, I am particularly interested in anyone who can recommend good Catholic fiction or poetry, specifically by an English speaking author, from any period.
Brian, I posted the following list on another thread about top 10 books, and I **highly **recommend Fr. Elijah. It’s a novel about the apocalypse and it is not only very readable, but you may finding yourself amazed at how realistic a scenario of the end times O’Brien creates.

Books I would not be without:

**Bible **
Catechism
Abandonment to Divine Providence (Jean-Pierre De Caussade)
Preparation for Death (St. Alphonsus de Liguori)
Triumph: The Power and the Glory of the Catholic Church (H. W. Crocker)
The Sinner’s Guide (Venerable Louis of Granada)
The Spiritual Combat (Dom L. Scupoli)
To Know Christ Jesus (Frank Sheed)
Theology for Beginners (Frank Sheed)
The Faith Explained (Leo Trese)
Interior Castle (St. Teresa of Avila)
The Way of Perfection (St. Teresa of Avila)
Fr. Elijah (Michael O’Brien)

I know there are more that I’m not thinking of. I’m enjoying reading the lists others have provided here, and taking notes. 🙂
One book I plan on getting:
Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma (Ludwig Ott)
 
yinekka said:
1. “If Your Mind Wanders At Mass” Thomas Howard
2. “The Lamb’s Supper” Scott Hahn
3. “Theology For Beginners” Frank Sheed
4. “Apologetics and Catholic Doctrine” Archbishop Sheehan edited by Fr Peter Joseph
5. the “Prove It” series by Amy Welborn - great books for teenagers or undercatechised adults
6. “Catholicism for Dummies” Fr John Trigilio and Fr Ken Brighenti
7.“My Meditation On the Gospel” Fr James E Sullivan
8. “Where We Got the Bible” Henry Graham
9. “To Know Christ Jesus” Frank Sheed
10. All 7 volumes of “In Conversation With God” by Fr Francis Fernandez

What can you tell me about #9 “To Know Christ Jesus”?

Would that be a good one to give to a Catholic who for the past 17 years has been immersed in the Baptist Tradition?

My brother, cradle catholic, after his divorce remarried a baptist woman. They are a wonderfully devout family and I get the impression he is banking on this personal relationship with Jesus and his good works to be enough to get him to heaven…

but since he’s a Catholic who received all his sacraments, I’m getting a message from the Holy Spirit that this will not be enough for him (the scripture passage from Luke 12:48 “For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required: and to whom men have committed much, of him they will ask the more.” is what came into my mind one evening, followed by thoughts of my brother)…so I’m moved to try to bring him home to his roots (a daunting task as I’m the baby sister, he’s the eldest, and we aren’t really close).

Since I know he values his personal relationship with Jesus, would this book appeal to that? I’m getting the impression the Lord wants me to gently remind my brother of the covenant he entered into through his baptism and confirmation so I’m looking for books/CDs along those lines - if they share the Baptist view of Catholicism - even better, I think.

Any one else here have any suggestions?
 
Slowly chewing on a few books at this time:
  1. Spirit of the Liturgy (Ratzinger)
  2. Mother Angelica (Arroyo) - What a stitch she was. Hard to put down this book.
  3. Fr.John A. Hardon’s “Catechism” (The big yellow one)
  4. The Devout Life (St. Francis De Sales)
  5. A daily staple, is “My Daily Bread” by the Passionists
I’ve got so many books by Ratzinger, Hardon, among many others, I do not watch TV anymore. Now, if only I could get off this website I could get more reading time.

Among my favorites, not recently read, are the works of St. John of the Cross. Haven’t gotten to St. Teresa yet (any of them), but hope to soon.
 
Lukewarmness: The Devil in Disguise by Francisco Carvajal

Theology and Sanity by Frank Sheed

Anything by St. Julian Eymard

GK Chesterton: Francis of Assisi, The Everlasting Man, The Dumb Ox, etc.

Did someone mention the Catechism?

in XT.
 
Aquinas,

GREAT list (esp. Sheed). Our tastes are nearly identical, so I want to recommend to you one more, if you haven’t yet come across it:

This Tremendous Lover
by Boylan

Amazing.

VC
 
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Brian:
As an addendum, I am particularly interested in anyone who can recommend good Catholic fiction or poetry, specifically by an English speaking author, from any period.
Flannery O’Connor
Graham Greene
Evelyn Waugh
Gerard Manley Hopkins
Tolkien
 
Verbum Caro:

Thanks for adding that one, I can’t believe I forgot that. I’ve read that too. You’re right, almost identical.

Brian:

Fiction: Chesterton’s Man Who Was Thursday, Napoleon of Nottinghill(?). Both are unpredictable and unexpected. But the depth of Tolkien is underrated in my opinion. He inserted so many of the catholic faith in it e.g. the design of Minas Tirith being a 7 level castle in which the top is where the King lives correspond to St. Teresa of Avila’s Interior Castle(another great book).

in XT.
 
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puzzleannie:
Flannery O’Connor
Graham Greene
Evelyn Waugh
Gerard Manley Hopkins
Tolkien
Yes yes yes!

Every Catholic simply MUST read Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh, and The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene.

Let me add R.H. Benson’s Lord of the World as the perfect Catholic antidote to the Left Behind junk-fiction, and also as a wonderful Catholic spin on the the pagan apocalyptic themes of George Orwell. Benson wrote during the same time as Orwell, but it is Benson’s vision that has accurately forecasted the troubling climate we live in today. Orwell is more fashionable but Benson’s work is more profound.
 
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